For a better society consume beer together and in moderation

Wednesday, 27 March, 2013

Beer, though not possibly as strong as contemporary brews, played a significant part in bringing our long distant ancestors together to think and act collectively, and in the process had a part in forming the basis of today’s societies.

Once the effects of these early brews were discovered, the value of beer (as well as wine and other fermented potions) must have become immediately apparent. With the help of the new psychopharmacological brew, humans could quell the angst of defying those herd instincts. Conversations around the campfire, no doubt, took on a new dimension: the painfully shy, their angst suddenly quelled, could now speak their minds. But the alcohol would have had more far-ranging effects, too, reducing the strong herd instincts to maintain a rigid social structure. In time, humans became more expansive in their thinking, as well as more collaborative and creative. A night of modest tippling may have ushered in these feelings of freedom – though, the morning after, instincts to conform and submit would have kicked back in to restore the social order.

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