A new trailer for “The Martian”

Friday, 28 August, 2015

The latest trailer for Ridley Scott’s upcoming sci-fi adventure feature, The Martian, that is due for release in Australia at the end of September. I have to say, this looks promising.

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The world needs more emojis, so turn photos into emoji mosaics

Friday, 28 August, 2015

This sounds incredible, but it has been almost three years since I last mentioned the word “emoji” here. It also happened to be first as well. That is weird though, because the world is awash with emoji, the smileys, emoticons, or pictographs, that originated in Japan.

I better get back with the program then… here’s a link to Emoji Mosaic, by Eric Andrew Lewis, that allows you to turn any image you care to choose, into a mosaic of emoji characters.

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The creative’s voice, something that takes time to find

Friday, 28 August, 2015

Creatives, be they writers, artists, musicians, designers, photographers, or illustrators, to name but a few, have a voice, or a particular way of expressing themselves, through their work.

And here’s the thing, rarely is someone born with this voice, it is something that evolves, sometimes quite slowly, over time.

Unquestionably, there are outliers among us, but there is also a fairly identifiable path that many of the most resonant artists, writers, and even leaders have walked on their journey to greatness. While we often believe that mastery and success are singular events, they typically arrive in layers.

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The one hundred greatest songwriters of all time, by Rolling Stone

Friday, 28 August, 2015

Rolling Stone have put together a list of the one hundred greatest songwriters. Björn Ulvaeus, and Benny Andersson, the male half of erstwhile Swedish pop group Abba, rate a mention at number one hundred. Ok, I think their inclusion is justified…

“Each song had to be different,” Andersson said in 2002, “because, in the Sixties, that’s what the Beatles had done. The challenge was to not do another ‘Mamma Mia’ or ‘Waterloo.’”

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Watch a pistol discharge in ultra slow motion

Thursday, 27 August, 2015

Since I like looking at super slowed down slow motion video, here’s footage, filmed at a rate of seventy-three thousand frames per second, of a pistol being fired. Incredible.

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Tintin? In the nude? In the Congo?

Thursday, 27 August, 2015

In order to preserve the venerable comic hero’s dignity, who is depicted totally naked in Thomas Lebrun’s “Tintin au Congo a poil”, or “Tintin in the Congo in the Buff”, a parody of “Tintin in the Congo”, originally published in the early 1930s, by Belgian cartoonist Hergé, I won’t post an image.

“Tintin in the Congo” was the last Tintin book I read, that would be about ten years ago now, when someone gave it to my nephew as a gift, but I was taken back by the racism, and violent treatment of some of the animals that Tintin himself encountered. I guess that’s one reason behind Lebrun’s work.

Possibly NSFW, as you might have guessed.

Via Forbidden Planet Blog.

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The Paleo diet was only the beginning, now there’s Paleo parenting

Thursday, 27 August, 2015

I’ve known of the Paleo, or Paleolithic, diet for sometime, that propagates the idea of consuming the sort of food that humans who lived in the order of ten thousand, to two million, years ago, ate. We’re talking meat, nuts, and berries, but not diary, here. The diet is favoured by some people, living today that is, but also has its critics.

What was new on me though, was the concept of Paleo parenting, or the latter day adopting of Paleolithic child rearing techniques:

Just as Paleo dieters assume a mismatch between human biology and the food culture of the postindustrial West, Paleo parents believe that modern parenting habits don’t support healthy child development. We can raise healthier and happier children, they argue, if we rear them more like early humans did 12,000 years ago.

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Would the world’s actual remotest city please stand up?

Thursday, 27 August, 2015

Being labelled the world’s remotest city probably isn’t as bad today as it might have been fifty, to one hundred, years ago. In the past, trying to reach such a seemingly inaccessible place might have deterred many would-be travellers. Now it would probably be the destination of choice, on account of its apparent isolation.

The problem is though, which “remotest city” in the world is in fact the remotest? There are a number of contenders for the title, including Nuuk in Greenland, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky in Russia, Mêdog in Tibet, and Perth in Western Australia.

Then there is Perth, with a metropolitan area of more than two million people, way on the other side of the outback from Sydney, 2,045 miles away. Geographically it’s actually closer to East Timor (1,731 miles) and Jakarta, Indonesia (1,865 miles). There’s no city of comparable size anywhere in the world that’s so remote.

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Bali, as seen in six short films

Wednesday, 26 August, 2015

Six stories of Balinese customs and traditions, filmed by Brandon Li, during a recent trip to Indonesia. Beautiful.

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Technology takes work away, technology gives work back?

Wednesday, 26 August, 2015

A study of British census data, dating back over one hundred and forty years, suggests that far from doing away with jobs, emerging technologies in fact give rise to new work opportunities.

A study by economists at the consultancy Deloitte seeks to shed new light on the relationship between jobs and the rise of technology by trawling through census data for England and Wales going back to 1871. Their conclusion is unremittingly cheerful: rather than destroying jobs, technology has been a “great job-creating machine”. Findings by Deloitte such as a fourfold rise in bar staff since the 1950s or a surge in the number of hairdressers this century suggest to the authors that technology has increased spending power, therefore creating new demand and new jobs.

That was then, this is now. With talk of white collar jobs under threat from artificially intelligent robots, will that trend hold up for the next one hundred and forty years?

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