Sight, a New York restaurant just for people who Instagram food?

Friday, 27 May, 2016

People don’t care how their food tastes, as long as it looks amazing when it is photographed, that’s “sight” for you, a recently opened restaurant in New York City, that specialises in the presentation of its dishes, especially for their Instagram loving diners. I’m unable to find the address though. Isn’t that strange?

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Let your sleep patterns determine your citizenship

Friday, 27 May, 2016

Are you living in one country, but feeling an affinity for another? Your sleep patterns may back up the assertion, possibly. I’m in Australia, but appear to have the sleep patterns of a Spanish woman. Curious. Portugal is a country I very much like, not that there’s anything wrong with neighbouring Spain of course, so maybe that has something to do with it?

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Not for publication, the book title of your choosing

Friday, 27 May, 2016

Are you writing a novel, and have an idea for the title? It may not make it to publication however, if it’s not deemed marketable enough. A shame, as I think an author would be the best person to title their book, in that they probably have the best understanding of the subject matter.

When I was readying my first novel for publication, it struck me that writers have far more control over what’s in their books than what’s on them – the cover art, blurbs, jacket copy, but especially the title, where the author’s concerns overlap with marketing ones. Deciding on a name for your life’s work is hard enough; the prospect of changing it at the eleventh hour is like naming your newborn, then hearing the obstetrician say, But wouldn’t Sandra look amazing on the certificate?

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Aphantasia, a medical condition that deprives people of imagination

Friday, 27 May, 2016

It seems incredible, but there are people who cannot visualise ideas, places, or even faces, in their minds, and aphantasia is the name given to their condition.

This newly described condition is called aphantasia and has prompted scientists to reexamine an experience that we so often take for granted – our imagination. What’s more, studying it is offering new insights into how we all might boost our visual imagery to improve our memory, increase our empathy and even gain new treatments for conditions like addiction and anxiety.

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You’ll see more of Mongolia if travelling by bike and packraft

Thursday, 26 May, 2016

One way to see Mongolia, with bikes and packrafts. Possibly not the most comfortable way to move around, but you’d certainly see more than if you travelled by bus or train.

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How do you announce contact with extraterrestrials anyway?

Thursday, 26 May, 2016

SETI scientists had developed procedures for announcing the discovery of, or contact with, an extraterrestrial intelligence, more than thirty years ago. Long before the internet became mainstream, and the advent of social media.

But there is a problem. Since the guidelines were written, the way news stories evolve and spread through society has changed dramatically. In the 1980s, 24-hour news channels were a novelty. Now they have been superseded by Internet news sites and aggregators such as Reddit and Slashdot and by online social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and so on.

So, how would they go about disseminating such news now? It looks as if the process will need to thought through again.

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Drinking alcohol, good for a buzz, but not for long

Thursday, 26 May, 2016

This probably comes as little surprise to anyone… alcohol consumption may lift our mood, but will only do so for a short time.

Study leader Dr. Ben Bamburg Geiger, from the University of Kent in the United Kingdom, found that while drinking alcohol makes us momentarily happy, it fails to offer long-term life satisfaction and well-being.

I’d say there are other ways of seeking contentment and fulfillment, thankfully, though I wouldn’t go cancelling after works on Friday.

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A shocking form of retail… therapy surely?

Thursday, 26 May, 2016

A smart wristband, that is linked to a wearer’s bank accounts, can be programmed to dispense an electric shock if they spend too much money at a time.

When the user goes on a shopping rampage, as they near the threshold, they’ll receive a notification on their phone. If they pass this threshold, Interact IoT will send a ping to their wristband, and the account owner will receive an electric shock.

My question, does it zap someone before they are about to spend over their limit, or after they already have?

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When the world we see, and the world we imagine, meet

Wednesday, 25 May, 2016

Is psychedelic the right word to describe the video for Eagle Eye, by New York City based musician Ava Raiin? Possibly.

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Read once, write always, should software developers read novels?

Wednesday, 25 May, 2016

Could reading the novels of Virginia Woolf hone the skills of a software developer?

It may help, possibly:

But if anything can be treated as a plug-in, it’s learning how to code. It took me 18 months to become proficient as a developer. This isn’t to pretend software development is easy – those were long months, and I never touched the heights of my truly gifted peers. But in my experience, programming lends itself to concentrated self-study in a way that, say, “To the Lighthouse” or “Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction” do not. To learn how to write code, you need a few good books. To enter the mind of an artist, you need a human guide.

How about the works of Jane Austen? I’m reading Mansfield Park at the moment… it makes me feel as if I am parsing code at times.

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