Painting the town red, and all sorts of other colours as well

Tuesday, 4 August, 2015

Palmitas, photo by the German Crew

The Palmitas district, of the Mexican city of Pachuca, has been transformed into something rather spectacular, thanks to the efforts of a number of organisations working together as the German Crew. Some two hundred homes are now part of what must surely be one of the largest murals in the world.

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To work from home, or not. As if you need an excuse

Tuesday, 4 August, 2015

More of a resource for those looking for a reason not to present at the office, as opposed to anyone who actually needs a reason to in fact work from home, rather than traipse into the workplace. The Work From Home Ninja may then be good for an excuse to do so. Work from home without actually working, that is.

If you’re going to be working from home in my home though, trust me, you’ll be working. Just to be clear.

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What do machines sing of? The desire for a human personality?

Tuesday, 4 August, 2015

A machine that so much desires to be possessed of a human personality, it continuously sings number-one ballads that were written in the 1990s. Work on those vocals, and it may yet pass the Turing test…

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Your website looks the same as all the others, but so what?

Tuesday, 4 August, 2015

Websites all look the same, it’s a comment I hear bandied about from time to time. But then again, everything looks the same, cars, phones, computers, aircraft, cities. Or they can, if viewed in a certain way.

Singapore based web developer Yugene Lee suggests though that not too many people are worried. It’s not what a website looks like, the main concern is what the website (or car, or phone, or computer, or aircraft) does.

People are complaining that the web looks the same, every website looks like each other. And there is no value in web design anymore. But, the problem is it doesn’t just happen in the web industry, it happened in every school of design.

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Japan, as seen with 8-bit animated GIFs

Monday, 3 August, 2015

Animation/artwork by 1041uuu

Day to day life in Japan, as depicted through a series of intricately fashioned animated GIFs.

Mind. Blowing.

Via Design Made in Japan.

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Got a tail? That is, are you being followed? Here’s how to shake it

Monday, 3 August, 2015

If, for whatever reason, you feel someone may be following you, there are a number of ploys at your disposal for throwing them off the trail. If you happen to be in a city area, revolving doors make for a pretty good way to gain some distance. Assuming whoever is watching you is trying to do so discretely, that is.

If you’re being followed in a busy city area, Maroney also advises using a spinning or revolving door in a commercial building. Pretend to enter the building by using the revolving doors, but actually circle all the way around and out again. The person following will get thrown off by this action and, therefore, stuck in the building.

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The fibonacci shelf will help get your interior design ratios right

Monday, 3 August, 2015

fibonacci shelf components

Put the above pieces together, and what do you get? A fibonacci shelf of course, whose component design, by Peng Wang, adheres to the Fibonacci sequence.

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When you are four weeks old, a week is a quarter of your life

Monday, 3 August, 2015

Some scrolling required, but that’s part of the idea… a visualisation explaining why time feels as if it moves faster as we age. At age ten, a year is a tenth of our life, a twentieth at twenty, a fiftieth at fifty, and what have you, and each year becomes a smaller fraction of the sum total.

Your summer vacation in your first year in college will feel as long as your whole 76th year.

Live and enjoy, I say.

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Friday afternoon, almost, and the ripple effect

Friday, 31 July, 2015

Just right – take a look, and you’ll see what I mean – for a what’s almost Friday afternoon, Ripple, an animation stitched together with images found on Google Earth and Wikimedia Commons, among other sources, by Conner Griffith, a Rhode Island based film student.

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If we destroy the Moon, we destroy ourselves

Friday, 31 July, 2015

The Moon is not always a friend of terrestrial astronomers. The light it casts, especially during its full phase, deprives the night sky of the darkness needed to observe other celestial bodies. This must be frustrating. Along with those clouds that sometimes completely block our views of the heavens. And don’t get anyone started on the Sun.

So, could the Moon be taken out of the picture. Removed. Deleted. Destroyed? Well, it is possible, if we had access to enough energy, but things wouldn’t really end all that well for us on Earth, with the Moon gone…

Astronomers use the Roche Limit to calculate how close an object – like a moon – can orbit another object – like a planet. This is the point where the difference between the tidal forces on the “front” and “backside” are large enough that the object is torn apart, and if this sounds familiar you might want to look up “spaghettification.” This is all based on the radius of the planet and the density of the planet and moon. If the moon got close enough to the Earth, around 18,000 km, it would pull apart and be shredded into a beautiful ring. And then the objects in the ring would enter the Earth’s atmosphere and rain down beautiful destruction for thousands of years.

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