Wes Anderson; A Group Exhibition, in Adelaide, South Australia

Thursday, 26 February, 2015

Wes Anderson; A Group Exhibition

It’d be fair to say I’m a fan of the work of US film director Wes Anderson, so it’s a little unfortunate that I’ll more than likely miss Wes Anderson; A Group Exhibition, unless I can get myself to Adelaide, at a point between the time the art show opens on Thursday, 5 March, through to its close on 1 April.

Lisa King is among artists whose work will be featured at the show, being held at Sugar Nightclub, Level 1, 274 Rundle Street, Adelaide.

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“The Simpsons”, an eight-bit intro by La Tigre Forte

Tuesday, 24 February, 2015

And on the subject of the Simpsons, an eight-bit variation of the show’s opening sequence, produced by Melbourne based animators La Tigre Forte.

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The VCR glitch and the art that it inspired

Wednesday, 18 February, 2015

Artwork by Corey Johnson

Video, or VCR tapes, may have been cumbersome, and prone to what seemed like all to frequent failure, possibly by way of jamming up, but some of the images, of a movie or recorded TV show, in stalled playback, could sometimes be possessed of a certain intrigue.

These errors, or erratic irregularities, have gone on to inspire Corey Johnson to create a series of eerie yet alluring artworks, some static, some animated, that he calls Art of the Glitch.

Via Kill Screen.

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An illustrated history of sushi

Wednesday, 18 February, 2015

An illustrated history of sushi… it’s a dish that has been around for centuries, although not quite in the format that we’re familiar with.

In the case of Nare sushi, which was being consumed some five thousand years ago in southern China, preparation took about a year, on account of the pickling process, and while rice was an ingredient, it was more of a stuffing, and usually not eaten when the dish was eventually served.

Dozens of rice-stuffed fish would be packed in a wooden barrel and then weighed down with a heavy stone. The fish would sit for a year before being cracked open for consumption. “No one ate the rice back then. It was just the fish.” This practice spread to Japan but eventually went out of vogue in China after northern nomadic tribes invaded and ruled the area. “Even today, this style can still be found in some parts of Yunnan and northern Thailand,” Isassi says.

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The secret life of machines, and other things, illustrated

Tuesday, 17 February, 2015

An illustrated guide to how things, many things, work, things such as fax machines, cars, electric lights, central heating systems, photocopiers, and my personal favourite place/object ever, offices, by Tim Hunkin.

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Artworks made possible thanks to coffee stains

Monday, 16 February, 2015

Artwork by Carter Asmann

Before the days of the paperless office we probably all had one or two documents – if you remember such things – on our desks that sported circular shaped coffee stains, the result of the contents of a coffee cup, left sitting in the wrong place, somehow spilling.

Most of these disfigured papers likely ended up in the waste paper bin – if you remember such things – an outcome that may have been rather wasteful.

Thankfully not all such items met such a fate though, and Carter Asmann, a California based artist and illustrator, has found inspiration in these blemished documents as a basis for illustrations featuring cars, motorcycles, bikes, and a range of other artworks that include circles.

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Pantone colour card artworks by Nick Smith

Thursday, 12 February, 2015

Artwork by Nick Smith

British artist Nick Smith has created a series of artworks, based on other well known paintings and the like, by way of Pantone colour cards.

I wish I’d thought of this…

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Barry Patenaude, Sydney based illustrator

Wednesday, 11 February, 2015

Illustration by Barry Patenaude

The work of Sydney based illustrator Barry Patenaude includes images featuring cutaways, such as “Pepsico” above, an added bonus for anyone – such as me – who likes to see what’s happening behind the scenes as it were.

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I am a writer, but am I famous yet? This flowchart might know

Wednesday, 11 February, 2015

Am I a famous writer yet? You probably don’t need a flowchart to help you determine the answer, but I guess there’s no harm in double checking…

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The matte artworks of the original “Star Wars” films

Friday, 6 February, 2015

Matte painting by Frank Ordaz

Before filmmakers were able to rely on CGI to create backdrops for some of the scenes they needed, artists used to paint matte pictures of the required vistas. Such works were used extensively throughout the original “Star Wars” trilogy of films for instance, and a collection of these images is featured here.

I knew some of the backdrops in these movies, such as this one by Frank Ordaz, were paintings, but didn’t realise just how many there actually were.

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