Suburbs, as seen by Florida artist Matthew Cornell

Friday, 27 March, 2015

Artwork by Matthew Cornell

The work of Florida based artist Matthew Cornell brings to mind an idealised notion of suburbia that lurks in my mind… in a serenity of the neighbourhood in the cool evening air, sort of way.

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See Vincent Van Gogh’s paintings now, before they all turn white

Monday, 23 March, 2015

If you’re yet to view the actual paintings of Vincent Van Gogh, as opposed to photos or footage of the works, now might be a good time… it seems a synthetically-made paint that the Dutch Post-Impressionist artist made use of, is now resulting in a discolouration of the same artworks, causing some hues to turn white.

Also known as red lead, plumbonacrite is suspected to be one of the first synthetically-made paints known to man, and van Gogh was a particular fan of the stuff. In many of his paintings he used bold colors – including the red hue – which apparently degrades like a Gobstopper candy when exposed to light.

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Houses and buildings that are literally UP in the air

Thursday, 12 March, 2015

Image by Laurent Chehere

This collection of images by French photographer Laurent Chehere, reminds me of at least one relatively recent film, but how could they not?

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Piccadilly Circus Underground station, from underground

Wednesday, 11 March, 2015

Piccadilly Circus by Renzo Picasso

There was a time when I’d be in and out, or through, London Underground station Piccadilly Circus several times a day, yet despite the fact it only serves two tubes lines, the station seemed like a tangled series of interconnected walkways. Or at least whenever I was in a hurry to get from one part to another, that is.

This three dimensional illustration by Italian architect Renzo Picasso, dating from 1929, however puts the station, and also the roadway junction, or circus I guess, above it, into a clear perspective.

Via things magazine.

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Designing Google’s new office

Monday, 9 March, 2015

US tech company Google are drawing up plans for a new office building at their Mountain View, California, headquarters. In short, they’re hoping to build a workplace that both melds with the environment and is one with nature.

They’re certainly taking a holistic approach here, and are probably fortunate in that they have the appropriate resources to do so. I wonder if this will be the way of things to come, in terms of workplace architecture?

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Justyna Kopania’s striking seascape artworks

Tuesday, 3 March, 2015

Painting by Justyna Kopania

A collection of striking oil paintings, depicting sail ships, by Warsaw based artist Justyna Kopania, evoke thoughts of a by-gone age.

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Wes Anderson; A Group Exhibition, in Adelaide, South Australia

Thursday, 26 February, 2015

Wes Anderson; A Group Exhibition

It’d be fair to say I’m a fan of the work of US film director Wes Anderson, so it’s a little unfortunate that I’ll more than likely miss Wes Anderson; A Group Exhibition, unless I can get myself to Adelaide, at a point between the time the art show opens on Thursday, 5 March, through to its close on 1 April.

Lisa King is among artists whose work will be featured at the show, being held at Sugar Nightclub, Level 1, 274 Rundle Street, Adelaide.

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“The Simpsons”, an eight-bit intro by La Tigre Forte

Tuesday, 24 February, 2015

And on the subject of the Simpsons, an eight-bit variation of the show’s opening sequence, produced by Melbourne based animators La Tigre Forte.

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The VCR glitch and the art that it inspired

Wednesday, 18 February, 2015

Artwork by Corey Johnson

Video, or VCR tapes, may have been cumbersome, and prone to what seemed like all to frequent failure, possibly by way of jamming up, but some of the images, of a movie or recorded TV show, in stalled playback, could sometimes be possessed of a certain intrigue.

These errors, or erratic irregularities, have gone on to inspire Corey Johnson to create a series of eerie yet alluring artworks, some static, some animated, that he calls Art of the Glitch.

Via Kill Screen.

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An illustrated history of sushi

Wednesday, 18 February, 2015

An illustrated history of sushi… it’s a dish that has been around for centuries, although not quite in the format that we’re familiar with.

In the case of Nare sushi, which was being consumed some five thousand years ago in southern China, preparation took about a year, on account of the pickling process, and while rice was an ingredient, it was more of a stuffing, and usually not eaten when the dish was eventually served.

Dozens of rice-stuffed fish would be packed in a wooden barrel and then weighed down with a heavy stone. The fish would sit for a year before being cracked open for consumption. “No one ate the rice back then. It was just the fish.” This practice spread to Japan but eventually went out of vogue in China after northern nomadic tribes invaded and ruled the area. “Even today, this style can still be found in some parts of Yunnan and northern Thailand,” Isassi says.

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