“2001: A Space Odyssey”, the animated cut

Monday, 29 September, 2014

There are some people who feel 2001: A Space Odyssey is a little too drawn out for their taste. Possibly then this sixty second animated version, by 1A4 STUDIO, may be more to their liking…

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The original soundtrack of 2001, as composed by Alex North

Wednesday, 10 September, 2014

I knew that Stanley Kubrick spent a lot of time thinking about the music for his 1968 feature 2001: A Space Odyssey, but I didn’t for a long time realise that US composer Alex North had been commissioned to write an entire sound track that Kubrick later opted not to use.

North’s composition, in its entirety, can be found here. What do you think? While, for instance, I like “Space Station Docking” by North, that would have featured during the flight to the space station, there’s no going passed Kubrick’s ultimate choice, “The Blue Danube”.

Via things magazine.

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“2001: A Space Odyssey” photos set between the scenes

Wednesday, 16 April, 2014

2001: A Space Odyssey set photo

I’ve seen some of these, while others are new to me, another collection of set, or behind the scenes, photos from the filming of 2001: A Space Odyssey.

In the above image, Stanley Kubrick (right), chats with Margaret Tyzack and Leonard Rossiter between takes.

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Studying the typography of 2001: A Space Odyssey

Tuesday, 11 February, 2014

Dave Addey scrutinises the use of typography in 2001: A Space Odyssey, and turns up a whole stack of details I hadn’t really given much thought to previously, including the way Stanley Kubrick set out the film’s title card:

[The] title card is set in Gill Sans, one of the all-time classic sans-serif fonts. Perhaps surprisingly, the zeroes in “2001” appear to be set with the Gill Sans capital letter O, rather than its zero character.

By the looks of it, this is the first in series of articles that Addey will be writing on the use of typography in science fiction movies.

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How do you depict extraterrestrials when you’ve not met any?

Monday, 28 October, 2013

In bringing 2001: A Space Odyssey to the screen, director Stanley Kubrick, and co-screenwriter Arthur C. Clarke, struggled to devise a credible looking species of extraterrestrials, to feature in the film:

What is important right now is the fact that the revelation of the physical appearance of the aliens in the book is one of the most shocking in sci-fi history: they turn on to look like the traditional human folk images of demons – large bipeds with leathery wings, horns and tails. Maybe Kubrick was amused by this shocking revelation and the effect that it may have had on the audience?

I think “2001” might have been a completely different film, likely far inferior, had they have not gone the way they eventually did, in this regard.

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Stanley Kubrick’s favourite movies

Wednesday, 7 August, 2013

Manhattan, by Woody Allen, still

Orson Welles, Laurence Olivier, Federico Fellini, Roman Polanski, Francis Ford Coppola, Mike Leigh, and Woody Allen, whose work features a number of times, are among directors whose films were admired by late US filmmaker Stanley Kubrick.

And on the subject of Kubrick, a transcript of the 1964 letter he sent to science writer Arthur C. Clarke, proposing the collaboration that would later bring forth 2001: A Space Odyssey:

It’s a very interesting coincidence that our mutual friend Caras mentioned you in a conversation we were having about a Questar telescope. I had been a great admirer of your books for quite a time and had always wanted to discuss with you the possibility of doing the proverbial “really good” science-fiction movie.

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2001: A Space Odyssey, but not a great film screenplay idea?

Friday, 2 August, 2013

2001: A Space Odyssey is a film that somehow shouldn’t work at all, yet succeeds at every level. Well, I think so at least. In this longer write-up, James Maynard Gelinas takes a closer look at the many aspects of Stanley Kubrick’s 1968 work that bring the story, such that it may be, together.

For unlike typical character and plot driven narrative, its structure is that of an odyssey portraying the span of millennia. There is no central protagonist in conflict with an antagonist to root for. The few depicted characters seem disconnected from one another, and their dialog is often irrelevant to expository action. Its pacing is slug slow, with excessive montage shots that while visually beautiful don’t move plot points forward. If classical music seems an odd score choice itself, several pieces selected are often disturbingly postmodern, evoking not a soothing softness of the musical genre but chaotic and disquieting emotions. Finally, the final sequence, rather than a climax and resolution to some character driven conflict, seemingly comes from nowhere leaving more questions than answers. In almost every way this film should have failed. But it didn’t. Instead, it’s considered a great masterpiece. Why?

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“2001: A Space Odyssey” premieres, see the film, read the comic book

Wednesday, 22 May, 2013

2001: A Space Odyssey premiere comic

I can’t say there’d be too many movies that are the subject of a comic strip about a family of four going along to said film’s premiere, but when we’re talking about 2001: A Space Odyssey it of course all makes sense.

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Illustrating the production of “2001: A Space Odyssey”

Wednesday, 20 March, 2013

A collection of drawings by British illustrator Brian Sanders made during the filming of 2001: A Space Odyssey, many of which, from what I understand, have only been published in the last decade or so.

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“HENRi” a sequel, in another universe, to “2001: A Space Odyssey”

Friday, 8 March, 2013

HENRi is a short sci-fi film about a derelict spacecraft drifting through space that is controlled by a human brain, named, you guessed it, Henri. Yearning to be able to moved independently though, Henri builds a mechanical body from parts lying around the ship.

Henri is voiced by Keir Dullea, who portrayed astronaut David Bowman in 2001: A Space Odyssey, and, if you ask me, gives the brain a sound not dissimilar to that of “2001” super-computer HAL.

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