All that you wanted to know about making t-shirts

Monday, 9 December, 2013

“There’s nothing ordinary about a simple t-shirt”… that you’ll probably agree with after watching this five part video series that tracks the production of a t-shirt, from cotton field, to your wardrobe cupboard.

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A simple fashion guide for the guy next door

Monday, 23 September, 2013

A simple fashion guide for men, the guy next door types, like me maybe, who tend to dress more casually most of the time.

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Wouldn’t you feel under-dressed if you didn’t wear clothes?

Wednesday, 18 July, 2012

And if we’re asking why we wear pants, we might as well go the full Monty and ask why do we wear any sort of clothing at all

Ask anyone why do we wear clothes: warmth and protection always top the list, whereas personal adornment, ritual, or modesty would come low on the list. Yet Montaigne is quite right: people that live in temperate climes are as fond of wearing clothes as the ones that live in more extreme climes; the amount of skin exposure and tempering of the body are matters of habit rather than necessity. Clearly, protection is not the main reason. What is this reason?

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It’s our inner warrior that commands us to wear pants

Wednesday, 18 July, 2012

The need to fight as effectively as possible while on horse-back appears to answer the question as to why people began wearing pants more often, as opposed to tunics or kilts, that used to be, many Moons ago, more popular.

Turchin details how the Romans eventually adopted braccae (known to you now as breeches) and documents the troubles a 3rd-century BC Chinese statesman, King Wuling, had getting his warriors to switch to pants from the traditional robes. “It is not that I have any doubt concerning the dress of the Hu,” Wuling told an advisor. “I am afraid that everybody will laugh at me.” Eventually, a different state, the Qin, conquered and unified China. They just so happened to be closest to the mounted barbarians and thus were early to the whole cavalry-and-pants thing.

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Travelling light and travelling with wrinkle free clothes

Tuesday, 6 March, 2012

If you’re travelling with a suit and want it to arrive at your destination wrinkle free, this might be worth trying:

I have tried this myself and I can ensure readers that, when done correctly, it works most of the time. You have to start with a pretty wrinkle-free suit, of course – this isn’t magic. And you must make sure to leave some air in the bag (and space in your bag in general) to make sure your suit doesn’t get crushed. I also always make sure the first thing I do when I arrive in my hotel room is remove my suits and shirts from my bag and hang them up. You should do that, too.

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Acid washed jeans are so passé, unwashed jeans are the new black

Thursday, 27 January, 2011

Upping the ante in the debate over how often jeans should, or should not, be washed… a university student wore the same pair of jeans for 15 months before finally washing them, all in the name of making a fashion statement.

Josh Le wore the same pair of jeans to break in the raw denim, so it would wrap the contours of his body, leaving distinct wear lines. He had his textile professor test the jeans for bacteria before washing them for the first time. The results showed high counts of five different kinds of bacteria, but nothing in the range of being considered a health hazard.

I think leaving worn jeans in the sun for a couple of hours can help extend the period between washes, but I don’t know about that pause being 15 months in duration.

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Dressing up, the artist’s guide to achieving sartorial excellence

Thursday, 27 January, 2011

Is the way an artist dresses somehow a representation of their work, or do artists simply dress so they look, or feel, like artists?

The relationship between an artist’s work and attire should function in the manner of a dialectic, in which the discrepancy between the personal appearance of the artist and the appearance of her work is resolved into a higher conceptual unity. An artist’s attire should open her work to a wider range of interpretive possibilities. The artist’s sartorial choices are subject to the same hermeneutic operations as are his work. When dressing, an artist should imagine a five-paragraph review of his clothes – the attitudes and intentions they reveal, their topicality, their relationship to history, the extent to which they challenge or endorse, subvert or affirm dominant forms of fashion – written by a critic he detests.

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A short history of (little washed) denim by Put This On

Thursday, 5 November, 2009

From the “how to dress like a grown up” video series by Put This On.

It may surprise you, but the best way to look after your jeans is to wash them as rarely as possible. That can mean every three to six months. Hmm.

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Are artists expected to comply to a dress code?

Thursday, 30 July, 2009

A dress code may make it easier for artists who are struggling to work out what to wear when they leave the house, especially if it’s their attire, rather than their art, that is being critiqued…

The artist’s sartorial choices are subject to the same hermeneutic operations as are his work. When dressing, an artist should imagine a five-paragraph review of his clothes – the attitudes and intentions they reveal, their topicality, their relationship to history, the extent to which they challenge or endorse, subvert or affirm dominant forms of fashion – written by a critic he detests.

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Washing machine that uses just a cup of water

Friday, 13 June, 2008

A washing that uses just one cup of water per cycle has been invented by a professor at the University of Leeds. Into the mix, along with regular washing detergent, are 20kg of plastic chips that “pound” clothes clean.

Professor Stephen Burkinshaw, who invented the machine – which uses one cup of water each cycle – said: “The performance of the Xeros process in cleaning clothes has been quite astonishing. “We’ve shown that it can remove all sorts of everyday stains including coffee and lipstick while using a tiny fraction of the water used by conventional machines.”

As a bonus the washing machine leaves clothes virtually dry at the completion of a cycle, eliminating the need for a clothes drier.

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