The cult of cheap, what’s old is new again, and it’s a lot cheaper

Friday, 30 October, 2009

There might be something in this approach, wait two years before seeing movies and buying anything else entertainment related, such as books and DVD box sets, and save a bundle of money when you pick them up at discounted sale prices.

It seems to me that the best way to instantly raise your standard of living is to live in the past. If you subsist entirely on two-year-old entertainment, and the corresponding two-year-old technology used to power it, you’re cutting your fun budget in half, freeing up that money for more exciting expenditures like parking meters and postage.

And in another example, “old favourites” at the local DVD/video shop cost $3 to hire for a week, that surely has to beat potentially paying up to $15 to see a new release movie.

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You can still make decent movies for less than $8 million

Friday, 9 October, 2009

Five groundbreaking movies that were produced on small budgets.

I’m not sure I’d consider eight million dollars low budget – as is the case for Little Miss Sunshine – but when compared to something like Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End which was said to cost some US$300 million, eight million suddenly doesn’t seem like a whole lot.

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Ugly dumps and startups, a recipe for success

Monday, 20 April, 2009

Startups can save a fortune if the founders decide to setup both their residence and workplace in the same place.

Also in Boston are Dan Haubert, 25, and Tom Davis, 24, who moved in together to launch TicketStumbler.com, which aims to be the Expedia of sports and concert tickets. The “ugly dump,” says Haubert, lets them “live and run a business on a few thousand a month.”

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Help your company by working from home

Wednesday, 4 March, 2009

To help cut operating costs some companies are now asking their employees to work from home, and in doing so reducing the need to lease office space.

Sure, employers have been doing this for years. But as the recession bites and companies look to save money on real estate costs, what was once a cushy perk is now deemed a business necessity. And that, along with a few choice enticements – voila!, a shiny new BlackBerry – is how companies are selling it to employees, whose emotions range from ecstasy to befuddlement.

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How to overhaul a website on a reduced budget

Wednesday, 4 February, 2009

Like just about everything else, website redesign budgets are being scaled back at the moment, but it’s still possible to bring about a revamp, it just requires a slightly different approach.

To be honest I think it is a good thing that people have less to spend on their websites. We have had too many clients approach us asking for complete overhauls of their sites when that is not what is really required. Often more subtle changes can have a greater impact over the longer term. They certainly generate a better return on investment.

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Websites done dirt cheap

Wednesday, 13 August, 2008

These $10 website things aren’t all beer and skittles mind you. In fact you’d actually be better off spending your $10 on beer and skittles. Drinking beer isn’t too tricky for “nontechies”.

There are some downsides to these free hosting services. Each offers several dozen design templates, but you could still end up with a site that looks pretty generic, unless you have Web-design skills or hire someone who does. What’s more, most of these services don’t offer an easy, one-click way to add flourishes such as shopping carts or more than two columns on a page; that, too, takes some know-how. Mostly, you just arrange pictures, text and other elements, and that’s it. And, sometimes, even doing that can be tricky for nontechies.

Remember you get what you pay for, which isn’t much.

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