To become a polymath dance as though no one is watching you

Monday, 9 December, 2013

A person who is described as a polymath could be considered to be a master of all, or many, trades. Leonardo da Vinci, and Benjamin Franklin, are but two example of such people.

The ability to excel in a number of fields isn’t restricted to a select few though, and just about all of us have polymathic potential, it’s just a matter of drawing it out of ourselves. How to make this so, then? Well, you could try dabbling in the performing arts, as the likes of dancing and acting boost learning capacity:

An intriguing study funded by the Dana foundation and summarised by Dr Michael Gazzaniga of the University of California, Santa Barbara, suggests that studying the performing arts – dance, music and acting – actually improves one’s ability to learn anything else. Collating several studies, the researchers found that performing arts generated much higher levels of motivation than other subjects. These enhanced levels of motivation made students aware of their own ability to focus and concentrate on improvement. Later, even if they gave up the arts, they could apply their new-found talent for concentration to learning anything new.

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The dance of the unnamed soundsculpture

Thursday, 10 May, 2012

Captivating viewing, a moving sculpture based on the recorded movements of a dancer.

The basic idea of the project is built upon the consideration of creating a moving sculpture from the recorded motion data of a real person. For our work we asked a dancer to visualize a musical piece (Kreukeltape by Machinenfabriek) as closely as possible by movements of her body. She was recorded by three depth cameras (Kinect), in which the intersection of the images was later put together to a three-dimensional volume (3d point cloud), so we were able to use the collected data throughout the further process. The three-dimensional image allowed us a completely free handling of the digital camera, without limitations of the perspective. The camera also reacts to the sound and supports the physical imitation of the musical piece by the performer. She moves to a noise field, where a simple modification of the random seed can consistently create new versions of the video, each offering a different composition of the recorded performance. The multi-dimensionality of the sound sculpture is already contained in every movement of the dancer, as the camera footage allows any imaginable perspective.

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Turn your BMX bike into a music making machine

Friday, 13 April, 2012

The Turntable Rider converts a BMX bike into a DJ’s turntable, and depending on your track bike riding skills, can mix up some pretty respectable tunes.

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Slowing down the dance of the Staatsballett Berlin

Tuesday, 3 April, 2012

Ultra slow footage of the dance moves of Marina Kanno and Giacomo Bevilaqua of Staatsballett Berlin (Berlin State Ballet). Radiohead’s “Everything in its right place” makes for the for perfect accompaniment.

Via Devour.

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Over 200 years in the making, the dance music you listen to now

Friday, 11 November, 2011

Evolution of western dance music

An interactive timeline that traces the origins of dance music’s many genres and sub-genres.

On the subject of dance music, a selection of imfamous dance music videos put together by inthemix.

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Parklife Sydney photos, Sunday, 3 October, 2010

Monday, 4 October, 2010

The Parklife electronic/indie music festival, which has been winding its way around Australia reached Sydney yesterday, and was based at its usual venue at Kippax Lake in Moore Park. Anyway for those who missed out, or for those there wishing to relive the experience, here are a few links to some photo collections from the event:

UPDATE #1: a few more Parklife 2010 photo collections from Sydney:

UPDATE #2: some more photo galleries by:

UPDATE #3: and a few more from…

If I find anymore I’ll add links in.

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Since I left you I found an Avalanches album so new

Tuesday, 15 June, 2010

Melbourne based electronica group The Avalanches are apparently very close to releasing a second album – a mere ten years after their debut – according to a post on the discussion forum of their website:

I hear Ariel Pink is recording some guest vocals for it and once those are done, the album will be finished (!).

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So long and thanks for all the sets, Nicole Foote leaves triple j

Monday, 22 March, 2010

The triple j dance music shows The Club, and Mix-Up, are going to be a whole lot different from now on, with the departure of the long time host of both shows, Nicole Foote.

Foote, who has been presenting the shows since 1999, is moving to Darwin where she will continue her radio and DJ-ing work.

Her final Club and Mix-Up shows, which went out last weekend, can be streamed for the next week or so.

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The future of music festivals, how many is enough?

Thursday, 4 March, 2010

The Future Music Festival is on at Sydney’s Randwick Racecourse this Saturday, 6 March. If inthemix had their way though, it would be just one of many such events to to be staged in Australia each year.

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The best bars in Sydney, 2009

Monday, 15 June, 2009

Timeout Magazine has published its list of Sydney’s best bars for 2009.

It was mildly amusing to see the Bentley Bar take out the gong for the best wine bar this year, given that it hasn’t always been a wine bar. Back in the day (the mid 1990s), the Bentley was a dimly lit dance music haven, where you could hang out listening to DJ sets all through the night, and shooting pool if you could get near one of its two tables.

Times have changed. I dare say I’d enjoy the Bentley as much today as I did 14 or so years ago.

Via Two Flat Whites.

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