How old is the oldest industrial complex? Older than you think…

Wednesday, 13 August, 2014

After taking some time to look through the History of Information it seems to me everything on Earth is older than I had previously thought. For instance the first known, so far, industrial complex dates back more than two and a half million years.

We’re sure not talking car manufacturing or the like here though, but organised production activities of some sort.

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Hit songs that ended up fading into obscurity

Wednesday, 30 July, 2014

Not all of the songs that reach the top of the music charts are destined to become classics, or end up even being remembered. In fact some of these tracks may find themselves vying for the title of most obscure of all time

Surprise. With a few exceptions, songs popular during the adolescence of people still alive today are much more popular than songs and racist comedy routines recorded during the reign of Queen Victoria.

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Have hipsters and the cashless society put paid to pick pockets?

Monday, 28 July, 2014

Pickpockets may soon be a thing of the past, as changes in fashion, that sees men wearing tighter fitting trousers, and a reduced reliance on cash, that results in people carrying less money generally, says Wilfred Rose, a former New York City wallet lifter, who spent the best part of forty years pilfering the pockets of its residents.

Then there was the time, he claims, that he decided to show off after spotting an off-duty sergeant, a renowned chaser of pickpockets, on his way to Yankee Stadium. Mr. Rose sidled up to him in the crowded train, plucked a roll of $300 from the man’s pocket and slipped $30 or $35 of his own money, in smaller denominations, into the sergeant’s pants. When the sergeant recognized Mr. Rose one stop later, he patted his pocket, reassured to feel money there. (In an interview, the sergeant, now retired, denied ever being bested by Mr. Rose.) But that was a long time ago. These are lean years for pickpockets. People carry more credit cards and less cash; men wear suits less, and tightfitting pants more. The young thieves of today have turned to high-tech methods, like skimming A.T.M.s.

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A 1785 guide to creating fireworks

Thursday, 10 July, 2014

I’m not sure what’s the more fascinating, a book, published in 1785, choke full of recipes for fireworks, or the tome, complete with hand crafted text and illustrations, itself.

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Taking a second look at “Catcher in the Rye”

Thursday, 10 July, 2014

I read “Catcher in the Rye” at high school, but don’t recall being all that focused for some reason. Perhaps it is time for a re-read, something US economist Tyler Cowen did recently, an exercise that brought forth some new insights into both the story itself, and its writer, J. D. Salinger.

Salinger took part in the D-Day invasion with part of the manuscript in his backpack. Salinger also fought in some of the toughest battles of WWII and later in his life sought extreme withdrawal. It all supports the notion of WWII as the major event in his life and one which he never got over. It is no accident that the deceased younger brother is named Allie.

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Into the wide blue coloured internet

Tuesday, 8 July, 2014

If there’s one colour that web designers and brand strategists have a preference for, it would be blue, but you don’t need me to tell you that. But why is so much blue used on the internet in the first place? Might it be because blue was one the first colours, aside from black and gray, to make an appearance online, back in the day?

The man who invented links was writing them to a grayscale screen. The first popular browser, Mosaic, later turned links blue because it was the darkest color available at the time that wasn’t black; they needed to stand out, but only just. Blue was the best alternative. Blue always survives the focus group. Blue wins the a/b test. Which is convenient, because blue is usually already there.

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Stonehenge is but one of many such megalithic stone structures

Monday, 7 July, 2014

New York City based visual artist and photographer Barbara Yoshida has travelled around Britain, Europe, and the Mediterranean region, taking pictures of ancient megalithic stone structures that are similar to, but perhaps not as well known as, Stonehenge.

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The kid next door and his nuclear reactor in the garden shed

Friday, 4 July, 2014

Imagine coming home one day to find scientists hard at work dismantling a nuclear reactor the teenager next door had decided to build in his parent’s garden shed. Apparently no one in the neighbourhood had any idea such a device was in their midst until then…

But June 26, 1995, was not a typical day. Ask Dottie Pease. As she turned down Pinto Drive, Pease saw eleven men swarming across her carefully manicured lawn. Their attention seemed to be focused on the back yard of the house next door, specifically on a large wooden potting shed that abutted the chain-link fence dividing her property from her neighbor’s. Three of the men had donned ventilated moon suits and were proceeding to dismantle the potting shed with electric saws, stuffing the pieces of wood into large steel drums emblazoned with radioactive warning signs. Pease had never noticed anything out of the ordinary at the house next door.

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I have sea fort and a constitution, I have my own nation

Thursday, 3 July, 2014

A former World War II sea fort located off the coast of Britain, in the North Sea, that slightly resembles an oil rig, and originally known as HM Fort Roughs, eventually went on to become the nation, or micronation, of Sealand.

British military personnel finally left the fort in 1956, and sometime later it was occupied by pirate radio broadcasters. In 1967 it was taken over by Paddy Roy Bates, who intended to establish his own pirate radio station there.

By 1975 Sealand had its own constitution, national anthem, flag, currency, and passport, while Bates ruled as a prince. In 1978 mercenaries staged an invasion while Bates and his wife were visiting Britain. Although Bates managed to regain control of the fort, the invaders continue to claim Sealand as theirs to this day.

There has a to be a screenplay in the story of Sealand…

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Family photos of the passage of time

Thursday, 3 July, 2014

In 1991 London based photographer Zed Nelson started taking a photo each year of a friend, and his family, until 2012. More of these sorts of photo collections – that span years and decades – seem to keep coming to light, but that doesn’t make them any less interesting.

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