There was once a place called Doggerland in Europe, check this map

Tuesday, 3 September, 2013

Doggerland, map by National Geographic Magazine staff

A landmass that connected what is now Great Britain to continental Europe, once existed up until about eight and half thousand years ago, and is known as Doggerland… at least by more contemporary geologists and scientists, that is.

(Map by National Geographic Magazine staff)

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Ian Silva’s made up maps of a made up place

Friday, 23 August, 2013

Sydney trainer driver Ian Silva spends his spare time producing intricate, highly detailed, maps of the Koana Islands, a fictitious nation situated in the Indian Ocean, about half way between Australia and Madagascar.

Koana Islands (pronounced Co-AHNAH Islands), officially the Republic of Koana Islands is an Oceania country situated in the middle of the Indian Ocean. It’s closest neighbours are Australia to the east, Madagascar to the west and India to the North. The capital city is Megopolis. The Koana Islands is made up of 32 islands, of which 11 are uninhabited and are national parks. The biggest island, Koana Island, has an area of approximately 574,925 square kilometres and is home to the vast majority of Koanians. All up, the 32 islands provide an area of 931,223 square kilometres, roughly the size of Spain and Sweden combined.

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A detailed map of asteroids orbiting near Earth’s orbit

Wednesday, 21 August, 2013

PHA orbit map by NASA

The blues lines in the above image, prepared by NASA, represent the orbits of PHAs, or Potentially Hazardous Asteroids, through the solar system.

It might look rather crowded out there (full size image), but that doesn’t mean any of the 1400 objects plotted here necessarily pose a threat to us… they just happen to cross the path of Earth’s orbit around the Sun at some point, and that point could be millions of kilometres from where we are now.

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The map that tells, rather than shows you, where to go

Tuesday, 20 August, 2013

Photo by Nobutaka Aozaki

New York based artist Nobutaka Aozaki is currently mapping out Manhattan. He’s not working alone though, in fact, posing as a tourist, he enlists the help of people he meets on the streets to put his map together, by asking them to hand write directions from their current location in the city, to another.

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Travel broadens the mind, so does looking at maps of the world

Tuesday, 20 August, 2013

Talk about a picture speaking a thousand words… there’s a lot to be learned about the way the world is, and was, from looking at maps that set out anything from people’s attitudes to foreigners and sexuality, through to writing systems, religious beliefs, ethnic diversity, and economic inequality, among others.

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And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by

Monday, 12 August, 2013

I guess we’ve all heard stories of explorers, sailors, and even people lost somewhere, who have managed to reach their destination, or a place they were hoping to find, solely through navigating by the stars.

It’s a method of navigation though that has always struck me as problematic because, you know, the stars are always in motion… how is anyone supposed to figure where they’re meant to be going when the goal posts are constantly changing, as it were?

As it happens there are only a few stars and constellations you need to know of to work out basic bearings, and from there you can, hopefully, work out the direction you need to be heading in.

For instance, the top and bottom stars in the Southern Cross, or Crux, to use its Latin name, always point south (and therefore north in the other direction), so working out other compass points becomes a lot easier.

The North Star isn’t visible below the equator. Instead, look for the constellation Crux – it resembles a kite. If you draw a line from the top of the kite to the bottom, it’ll point you south.

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Some colourful new direction for street maps

Friday, 2 August, 2013

New Delhi map by Jazzberry Blue

An illustrator and artist, going by the name Jazzberry Blue, casts the street maps of cities in a new light, and colour.

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The bright lights of London are best reached by… anagram

Friday, 19 July, 2013

London Underground anagram map

In the passed I’ve lived in Ah Balm, and near Bort Nix, among other places, according to this anagram-ised map of the London Underground.

Via Kottke.

And… on the subject of anagrams, look what result turns up when you Google the word.

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The stars of the big screen are now stars in the night sky

Friday, 28 June, 2013

Hollywood Star Chart, designed by Dorothy

I found a movie map, created by Manchester design studio Dorothy, based on an old street map of San Francisco, about a year ago, and now they’ve followed up with a series of Hollywood Star Charts, where constellations have been assigned film names, and their constituent stars the names of said movie’s actors.

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A political map of the supercontinent known as Pangea

Tuesday, 11 June, 2013

Pangea landmass, political map, detail

300 million years ago all the world’s islands, continents, and other landmasses, were part of a single supercontinent known as Pangea.

Assuming this massive expanse had not broken up – as it was doing about 200 million years ago – and the nations that we’re familiar with today had formed as, and where, they are now, this is what a political map of the world would look like.

For those interested, Pangea was not the first such supercontinent, it is thought to have been preceded, in the super distant past, by at least two other such bodies, Columbia, and Rodinia. It seems the Earth’s landmasses have regularly joined together, then drifted apart, during our planet’s 4.5 billion year lifetime.

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