Mix a beach, a stick, and some imagination, and you have sand art

Thursday, 15 May, 2014

Photo by 3DSD

Constanza Tagini Nightingale, Jamie Harkins, and David Rendu, are part of a New Zealand based multicultural art group, who etch three dimensional like drawings into the sands of local beaches. Too bad the works are only ever visible for a matter of hours at a time…

The beach and a stick provide infinite possibilities. Your imagination makes them a reality.

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Is it easier for New Zealanders to fake their own deaths?

Wednesday, 8 January, 2014

A new year, a new start… by faking your death? Don’t get your hopes up though. Very few people succeed in starting a new life by ceasing to be one person, and assuming the identity of someone else that they’ve created.

Apparently though New Zealand citizens, who can reside legally in Australia for, I believe, indefinite periods of time, have an edge in this regard however, thanks to a combination of privacy laws, and the fact they – seemingly – don’t have to pay taxes here:

For Verzi, fake-dying professionally means having a new, hard-to-trace identity ready. “It seems like the US has half the privacy laws we have so it’s much harder to disappear there. Actually, the hardest people to track are New Zealanders because they come here [to Australia], and they don’t vote or pay taxes and then they go home. It really helps if you’re a Kiwi.”

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Bowled over by Moeraki boulders at New Zealand’s Koekohe beach

Wednesday, 14 August, 2013

Moeraki boulder, photo by Russell Charters

California’s Death Valley has its sliding rocks, while New Zealand’s Koekohe beach, on the south east coast of the South Island, has Moeraki boulders, or large spherical rocks. Unlike the rocks in Death Valley though, I don’t think the boulders, despite being spherical, move around that much.

(Photo by Russell Charters)

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Wellington, New Zealand, little but not so little

Tuesday, 23 April, 2013

Little Wellington, a glimpse of the capital of New Zealand, also home to Webstock, and the iconic Beehive, one of the country’s parliament buildings.

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Trying for a try, it’s all in the anticipation

Wednesday, 6 March, 2013

I’ve rarely ever watched a game of rugby in its entirety, but this recent match between Super 15 teams the Highlanders and Chiefs, should have been an exception, if this snippet of play was indicative of the excitement of the rest of the game.

Both teams, by the way, are from New Zealand, and their players would go on to form the ranks of the All Blacks, which would be, historically/statistically, the best rugby team in the world. I suspect though plenty of people would disagree with such a statement.

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The view in Christchurch from the streets

Tuesday, 29 March, 2011

Eerily quiet video footage of the carnage wreaked by the earthquake in central Christchurch on 22 February, filmed by Civil Defence, New Zealand’s emergency response organisation.

Aside from some bird song, the occasional wail of a siren, plus the sounds of a couple of helicopters, the city centre is almost devoid of any signs of life.

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Photos of the Christchurch earthquake aftermath

Monday, 28 February, 2011

Photos of the heartbreaking carnage and destruction resulting from last Tuesday’s devastating earthquake in Christchurch, New Zealand, from The Big Picture.

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Found in a forgotten film archive, a lost John Ford silent movie

Friday, 11 June, 2010

A stack of 75 silent movies, many dating from the 1920s have been uncovered in an archive in New Zealand, and includes the only surviving copy of US director John Ford’s film, “Upstream”.

On account of exorbitant shipping costs at the time, film reels shipped out from the US to countries like Australia and New Zealand were seldom returned, a state of affairs that is now proving to be a boon for film historians.

Among the movies found in storage are a copy of Ford’s “Upstream,” the earliest surviving movie by comic actor and director Mabel Normand and a period drama starring 1920s screen icon Clara Bow. Only 15 percent of the silent films made by Ford, who won four Oscars, have survived.

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Webstock bags are swag unto themselves

Monday, 22 February, 2010

Webstock 2010 bag

I’ve been looking through some of the photos* from last week’s Webstock conference in Wellington, and of all things a picture of this year’s Webstock computer carry bag, above, caught my eye (photo by Cle0patra).

This has to be the best one yet, I already have the 2008 and 2009 bags, so here’s hoping I can get hold of this year’s as well.

* some photos are dated March 2009, I’m not sure why, a camera’s incorrect date setting possibly?

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Encyclopædia Britannica once didn’t recognise uncolonised lands

Friday, 13 November, 2009

While people continue to question the integrity of Wikipedia, early editions of one of its print predecessors, Encyclopædia Britannica, had a curious method – to say the least – of selecting what information it would publish.

Australia and New Zealand: Despite the fact that both lands had been discovered their existence was not recognised in the Encyclopaedia until they had been colonised.

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