Start me up… how to install Windows 95 onto an Apple watch

Tuesday, 3 May, 2016

There’s a few hoops you have to jump through, needless to say, but if you’re game enough to have a go, it is possible to install Windows 95, yes, from 1995, onto an Apple watch.

I was born in the nineties, and the first personal computer my family bought (a $3000 screamer with a 300 MHz Pentium II, 256 MB of RAM, and the optional Boston Acoustics speaker system) ran Windows 95. Also, this isn’t the first time I’ve installed an old operating system on a watch.

Why you’d want to do this however, I cannot say… out of feeling of nostalgia for operating systems from twenty years ago, perhaps?

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A good business is not built upon bells, whistles, and buzzwords

Monday, 2 May, 2016

Your Media Business Will Not Be Saved, focus on your core competencies, forget the bells, whistles, and buzzwords, they may even be worse than useless, is, I think, the message here.

Video will not save your media business. Nor will bots, newsletters, a “morning briefing” app, a “lean back” iPad experience, Slack integration, a Snapchat channel, or a great partnership with Twitter. All of these things together might help, but even then, you will not be saved by the magical New Thing that everyone else in the media community is convinced will be the answer to The Problem.

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Emotional responses to corporate text messages

Tuesday, 26 April, 2016

Emotional responses to corporate text messages… have you ever been tempted to reply to the generic, blanket, text message that large companies send to their entire customer base? Timothy R. Dunn was. Especially amusing though are the responses generated by Dunn’s replies.

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We could never run out of history, there’s too much of it

Friday, 22 April, 2016

Histography, an interactive timeline that spans the history of the universe, from the point of view of certain of the inhabitants of Earth that is, from the Big Bang, straight on through.

Note: you require either the Chrome, or Safari, web browsers to view this page.

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Is your web browser spying on you?

Monday, 18 April, 2016

Never mind what the snooping powers that be know about your activities online, your web browser, the application you may well be reading these words with, could be far more up with the play than you realise.

How about the feature that nominates your street address? While the guestimate it offered for my location was a little bit out, I expect there are occasions when it can be quite accurate.

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How W3C web standards, or recommendations, come to be

Friday, 15 April, 2016

If you’re a web designer or developer working to W3C standards, or more accurately recommendations, and you should be, then this article on they come to be, may interest you. It is, or used to be, a drawn out process, from the time a new recommendation is conceived, or proposed, to the time it is, or was, adopted as official.

First off, the “standards” created by the W3C aren’t really standards, but are rather a collection of specifications that instruct browsers on how to implement certain language features, so when we use a certain HTML element, browsers display it in pretty much the same way. The term “standards” isn’t used by the W3C; what we think of as “standards” are actually “recommendations”. The term “web standards” actually came from the Web Standards Project. Surprising, I know.

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Here’s a minute, because we all need to take some time out. Right?

Friday, 15 April, 2016

It could be using the A Minute app, might be the only way to take a minute out of our doubtless busy schedules, and do nothing for the duration. What do you think?

A Minute recognizes that our phones are the source of much of our distraction, but utilizes the device as an ally, the necessary structure, for tapping into the void. The app simply allows friends to send and receive minutes to sit back and enjoy doing nothing.

Via Hypnophant.

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Smart contact lenses, a camera for the eye’s eye?

Thursday, 14 April, 2016

Contact lenses may be about to become a whole lot smarter, if a patent filed by Samsung is anything to go by, with lenses they propose producing being capable of taking photos, and streaming videos that are stored on your smartphone.

To take pictures or interact with data displayed on their contact lenses, the user must blink. The motions are picked up by the sensors, and the commands are relayed to the user’s phone for processing, with the results being sent back immediately. The user can stream video or send images to their contact lenses from their smartphone, and send pictures they took with the integrated camera back to their mobile device for storage.

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Could you write a novel with a pool of only one thousand words?

Monday, 11 April, 2016

A few weeks ago I wrote about the most dangerous writing app, being software intended to help overcome writer’s block, that deletes all text if typing ceases for more than five seconds.

Now I’ve found another less than conventional writing app, Cleartext, a text editor that only allows a writer to use the one thousand most commonly used words in the English language.

Could a full size novel be written under such parameters? I’d be interested to know.

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Making a case for looking out the window

Monday, 11 April, 2016

I once worked on the top floor of a seven storey building, and there were two construction sites on either side of us. I think I lost count of the number of times I caught myself – and, equally as importantly, colleagues – staring out the windows, almost transfixed, by proceedings at both places, during the course of these works.

Looking out the window can sometimes be an underrated form of entertainment.

Windows are, in this sense, a powerful existential tool: a patch of the world, arbitrarily framed, from which we are physically isolated. The only thing you can do is look. You have no influence over what you will see. Your brain is forced to make drama out of whatever happens to appear. Boring things become strange. A blob of mist balances on top of a mountain; leafless trees contort themselves in slow-­motion interpretive dance; heavy raindrops make the puddles boil. These things are a tiny taste of the bigness of the world. They were there before you looked; they will be there after you go. None of it depends on you.

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