The Milky Way as seen from the Greek village of Petrilo

Thursday, 30 July, 2015

It seems to me that the best views of the Milky Way from Earth are to be seen in Petrilo, a Greek village, some two hundred or more kilometres north west of Athens, and this recently filmed footage of the night sky, by Konstantinos Vasilakakos, makes for a rock solid case to believe that.

Read more posts on related topics

, , ,

Crowdsourcing the solutions to unsolved mysteries and crimes

Thursday, 30 July, 2015

Members of Metafilter, a community weblog where every topic under the Sun, and beyond, is discussed, are compiling a list of crimes, mysteries, cases of fraud, missing persons, and the like, where a resolution of some sort came about through the efforts of online communities, bloggers, or other individuals and groups.

In just about all instances, use was made of information and resources located on the internet, in bringing about a determination.

The case of Kaycee Nicole, a US teenager who apparently died of cancer in 2001, would be one of the better known examples of crowdsourced sleuthing, and it was then members of Metafilter who exposed the story as an elaborate hoax.

Read more posts on related topics

, , ,

Here are (at least) ten of the most beautiful films ever made

Thursday, 30 July, 2015

It wouldn’t be an easy task trying to choose what might be the ten most beautiful films ever made, and that’s something the CineFix people, in putting together this list of ten movies that might belong in such a category, make clear.

No surprise though to see the work of filmmakers such as Woody Allen, Terrence Malick, Stanley Kubrick, and David Lean, included.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

Only for hamburger lovers, a recipe for a… hamburger cake

Thursday, 30 July, 2015

I can’t see the appeal myself of a hamburger cake, yes, that’s right, cake, made up, as the name suggests, of the main ingredients of hamburgers, but there is of course no accounting for taste. Here’s a recipe, should you have a hankering for such fare.

What could compare to the novel dissonance that comes with beholding a regal three-tiered iced wedding cake accompanied by strong whiffs of stewing hamburger meat? How could you live without once having the sensual experience of slicing into a beautiful frosted cake only to be greeted by so much ground beef? What else says “true love lasts forever” quite like a tiny bride and groom crafted out of cheap hot dogs?

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

Ryan Heshka’s vintage comic styled artworks

Wednesday, 29 July, 2015

Artwork by Ryan Heshka

For a nostalgic fix, check out the pulp magazine, vintage comic, styled artwork of Ryan Heshka, an artist and illustrator based in Vancouver.

Via Hypnophant.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

We want to see your Twitter page before signing the tenancy lease

Wednesday, 29 July, 2015

I don’t know how widespread this practice is among people leasing out apartments, the request that would-be tenants supply the URL of their Twitter page with their lease application. Surprisingly, it’s not an attempt to make a call on an applicant’s probity, but rather to gain an insight into who they are as a person. Apparently.

That wasn’t what they wanted. They didn’t want to see a perfect tenant: they wanted to see a human being, who I was in between the polite hellos at their front door and the exhaustively extensive credit checks and immigration documents. Who was this person that might be sleeping in their bed, watching their television or living above their daughter’s crib? Social media was, in my opinion, the worst place to find out who that person might be.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

To see the internet in fifty years time, look at the internet today

Wednesday, 29 July, 2015

San Francisco based computer programmer Maciej Ceglowski predicts that the internet in fifty years time will look much like the internet of today. The apparent lack of innovation over the next half century may not be quite as bad as it appears to be though.

This contempt for the past also ignores the reality of our industry, which is that we work almost exclusively with legacy technologies. The operating system that runs the Internet is 45 years old. The protocols for how devices talk to each other are 40 years old. Even what we think of as the web is nearing its 25th birthday. Some of what we use is downright ancient – flat panel displays were invented in 1964, the keyboard is 150 years old. The processor that’s the model for modern CPUs dates from 1976. Even email, which everyone keeps trying to reinvent, is nearing retirement age.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

Sea levels may be rising much faster than previously thought

Wednesday, 29 July, 2015

Some unsettling news regarding rising sea levels… it is possible that glaciers in polar regions may melt up to ten times faster than previously thought, something that may result in sea levels rising by over three metres within just fifty years, says a recent study.

The study – written by James Hansen, NASA’s former lead climate scientist, and 16 co-authors, many of whom are considered among the top in their fields – concludes that glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica will melt 10 times faster than previous consensus estimates, resulting in sea level rise of at least 10 feet in as little as 50 years.

That’s an alarming prospect, particularly for coastal communities, that will bear the brunt of any rise in sea levels.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

“Star Wars” style word wars opening crawl brings you news of wars

Tuesday, 28 July, 2015

I’m not quite sure what to make of Word Wars, by Julien Deswaef, that takes news items published by the New York Times, that feature the word war, and renders the headline into a short video based on the opening text crawl from the “Star Wars” films… I half expect one of the movies to begin after the scroll fades.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

On being remembered when people find you forgettable

Tuesday, 28 July, 2015

Struggling to make an impression with, and be remembered by, the right crowd? Why is it that some people succeed, and others fail, in this regard? Maybe you have an “average” face. Or a low-key disposition. Making yourself somehow unique, is one solution, offered by a group of psychologists tasked with answering the question.

It’s a fact. Many people are very forgettable. For some, it’s intentional. They prefer to stay in the shadows and not be seen. For others, they struggle to get noticed (and remembered) on a daily basis, to little or no avail. Unfortunately, many times it’s the extroverts that get remembered, since they’re the ones making a scene at the meeting or being the “loud one” at the party. That’s not to say an introvert can’t make an impression either.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,