Rachel Getting Married

Friday, 27 February, 2009

4.5 stars

Rachel Getting Married sees recovering alcoholic and drug addict Kym (Anne Hathaway) trying to make sense of her past, as the consequences of certain past actions manifest themselves in the lead up to her sister’s wedding.

Is she attempting to blame someone else for the tragedy that occurred, or is she onto something?

This is definitely the best Anne Hathaway performance I have seen to date.

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Photo: the green grass of the Lake District

Friday, 27 February, 2009

green and not so green meadows, Lake District, UK

The grass is always greener on one side than it is the other…

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For lunch today I’m dining on a… printout

Friday, 27 February, 2009

Now here’s an idea, edible printouts: an illustration of a meal printed out on rice paper.

Bon appetit!

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Mathematics is the common culture of the universe

Friday, 27 February, 2009

We were ever to encounter an extraterrestrial civilisation it is unlikely that we would be able to communicate with them by way of the spoken word, something many science fiction movies would have us believe is possible.

Rather we will most likely find ourselves exchanging ideas and thoughts by way of mathematics, says British Astronomer Royal Martin Rees.

They would be made of similar atoms to us. They could trace their origins back to the big bang 13.7 billion years ago, and they would share with us the universe’s future. However, the surest common culture would be mathematics.

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Days in the Making Exhibition, Adelaide

Friday, 27 February, 2009

Days in the Making Exhibition poster

Adelaide artist and designer Lisa King is one of the artists exhibiting work in the “Days in the Making” exhibition, which is on for one night only, Thursday March 26, at the Paperhorse Studios, Suite 1, Level 2, 93 Rundle Mall, in downtown Adelaide.

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When it comes to browser innovation Opera leads the way

Friday, 27 February, 2009

A number of browser manufactures apparently look to the Opera browser when seeking inspiration for their products writes Dustin Wilson.

Throughout the years Opera’s competition has released versions of their browsers with “new” features which are typically touted as innovations they did themselves, especially by Apple. Mozilla to its defense rarely (if ever to my knowledge) has done this, but Firefox fanboys typically flame others about features Firefox supposedly invented such as tabs when both Opera and Safari’s usage predates Firefox’s implementation of them.

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Connoisseur of wine I am not, wine labels I am

Friday, 27 February, 2009

A collection of fantastically designed wine labels (and even bottles), and just in time for the weekend.

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The realm of junk code, there be no standards here

Friday, 27 February, 2009

Producing bad HTML isn’t merely poor form, it borders on negligence:

Garbage HTML has a special something to it, a unique blend of being not just invalid, but disgustingly so by going beyond minor misunderstandings or typos and far into the realm of negligence – improperly nested tags, tags that are never properly ended, incorrect attribute usage, and so on. Why do developers crank out this junk?

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Future Music Festival 2009 Randwick site picture

Friday, 27 February, 2009

Future Music Festival 2009 Randwick site

Ah yes, a sneak preview of the site…

Not long now until the Saturday kick off of the Future Music Festival at Randwick racecourse!

Update: just read that tomorrow’s FMF event now kicks off at 12 noon rather than the earlier advertised time of 2pm.

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Banning books because of their content… lead content

Thursday, 26 February, 2009

Many children’s books printed in the US (and possibly elsewhere) prior to 1985 can no longer be sold or distributed, even at garage sales or by charity agencies, on account of the levels of lead that may be present in their inks and dyes.

Not until 1985 did it become unlawful to use lead pigments in the inks, dyes, and paints used in children’s books. Before then – and perhaps particularly in the great age of children’s-book illustration that lasted through the early twentieth century – the use of such pigments was not uncommon, and testing can still detect lead residues in books today. This doesn’t mean that the books pose any hazard to children.

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