Rebekah Lynne Spence, Louisiana based illustrator and graphic designer

Friday, 21 April, 2017

Illustration by Rebekah Lynne Spence

Check out the work of Rebekah Lynne Spence, an illustrator and graphic design student, from the US state of Louisiana.

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The top one hundred episodes of The Simpsons. But what to choose?

Friday, 21 April, 2017

This is a bold move, for sure. Alan Siegel, writing for The Ringer, ranks the top one hundred episodes of long running animated sitcom, The Simpsons.

To compile this list, I sought feedback from both hardcore Simpsons fans and former members of the show’s creative staff. Still, it was an inherently subjective undertaking. “You could choose every other episode from the first 200 episodes for your top 100 and you wouldn’t be too far off,” one Simpsons writer told me. I don’t claim to be a scientician, but I tried to be meticulous. So crack open a Duff and enjoy.

And in other news, can it really be thirty years since The Simpsons made their debut?

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Joi Murugavell, Sydney based artist and illustrator

Thursday, 20 April, 2017

Artwork by Joi Murugavell

Ever feel compelled to answer a question, because, well, you think you might be running out of time to supple an answer, or say something?

That’s called a tight answer deadline, and the practice has Sydney based artist and illustrator Joi Murugavell wondering if it’s a good idea, considering we’re likely being economical with the truth, in such situations.

That just might be one deadline we need to start missing more often.

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Advice for young, or emerging artists, from established artists

Thursday, 20 April, 2017

Further to my earlier piece.

An animation by Jerusalem based illustrator and designer, Daniella Shuhman.

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Daniela Achoyan, Argentina based artist and illustrator

Thursday, 20 April, 2017

Artwork by Daniela Achoyan

Daniela Achoyan is an artist and illustrator based in Argentina. There were quite a few of her works I could have featured here, but I was immediately drawn to the bright colours of this collage. Fantastic, isn’t it?

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Talent is luck, the important thing in life is courage. Oh, and luck also…

Thursday, 20 April, 2017

This ties in with what I call my pub (or bar) band theory. I’ve seen plenty of great bands performing in a bar. They play well, and their music is fantastic.

Yet somehow they don’t make it big. I know the definition of success varies, but some bands are destined to remain to pub bands, whether they want to, or not.

So what do the groups who make it big, those who score recording deals, and play to packed stadiums across the world, do right?

Two things possibly. They may have connections. Friends in the right place. And they are also, quite likely, lucky. Someone who can make things happens, hears their music, and likes it.

For the most part, creative success has little to do with talent or hard work. Lots of people are talented and hard-working. Talented and hard-working people are nothing special, for better or worse. To be successful, you need more than just talent and hard work. You need luck. Or, even better than luck, you need connections.

Not something that happens to everyone. In the meantime, if you’re short of connections, and luck, keep on keeping on.

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Miha Sarani, Seattle based fine artist

Wednesday, 19 April, 2017

Artwork by Miha Sarani

Miha Sarani is a Seattle based fine artist who hails from Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia. This abstract painting is a still a work in progress, but I think it’s great as is. I wonder how the finished product will turn out?

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Are aliens altering a star’s light spectrum so the universe can see them?

Wednesday, 19 April, 2017

Broadcast signals, radio and television for instance, might be one way an extraterrestrial intelligence could go about advertising its presence. For all the perils of doing so, of course.

The thing with regular broadcast signals though, is they degrade the further they move from their source. Ideas that any inhabitants of any planets orbiting Regulus – a star eighty light years distant – may be able to tune into TV shows first broadcast on Earth eighty years ago are fanciful, to put it mildly.

How then to tell the rest of the universe you’re there, if signal degradation is a concern? Altering the light spectrum of your host star may be a possibility.

Przybylski’s Star is about three hundred and seventy light years from the Sun, but its optical spectrum is baffling astronomers, on account of the presence of certain heavy elements that should not be there.

The star is laced with oddball elements like europium, gadolinium, terbium and holmium. Moreover, while iron and nickel appear in unusually low abundances, we get short-lived ultra-heavy elements, actinides like actinium, plutonium, americium and einsteinium. Hence the mystery: How can such short-lived elements persist in the atmosphere of a star?

How indeed? Some people have speculated that an alien intelligence is somehow adding in these unusual elements, as a way of drawing attention to themselves. It all sounds a bit complicated though. Why don’t they make a few TV shows, and broadcast them on a strong signal, instead?

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Ikea Heights, a melodrama made inside an IKEA store

Wednesday, 19 April, 2017

Ikea Heights was a melodrama web series made in 2009. As the name suggests, the show – which is reminiscent of something like Melrose Place – played out in an Ikea store.

While each episode is only minutes long, and the series was short lived, Ikea Heights was notable for the clandestine way it was filmed. During normal trading hours, and without the knowledge of customers, or the store’s management.

Seemingly IKEA don’t mind people filming things like this in their stores, so long as they know about it beforehand.

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Bernadette Pollard, Minneapolis editorial, documentary photographer

Wednesday, 19 April, 2017

Photo by Bernadette Pollard

Bernadette Pollard is a Minneapolis based editorial and documentary photographer. This photo was taken at Horseshoe Bend in Arizona. The bend is what’s called an incised meander of the Colorado River, which, as the name suggests, is horseshoe shaped.

The river, and the bend, are not visible here, but there’s still plenty to see. The more you look, the more detail you’ll discern.

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