Roses burnt black… romantic? Smouldering? Both, or not?

Monday, 27 July, 2015

Artwork by Ars Thanea

I’m not sure that sending my sweetheart roses burnt black sends exactly the right message at this point in the relationship… unless that is they’re the work of Warsaw based advertising and production agency Ars Thanea.

What can I say? Smouldering.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

People who run late, tardy yes, but also optimistic and productive

Monday, 27 July, 2015

Being late is often regarded as poor etiquette, and a lack of punctuality may be a deal breaker in certain situations. Such as job interviews and business meetings. There is an upside however to tardiness, hard as some people may find it to believe, a person constantly running late is most probably an optimist.

People who are continuously late are actually just more optimistic. They believe they can fit more tasks into a limited amount of time more than other people and thrive when they’re multitasking. Simply put, they’re fundamentally hopeful. While this makes them unrealistic and bad at estimating time, it also pays off in the long-run in other ways.

A happy, hopeful person, who is likely in good health, and probably also quite productive. It may then be well worth looking past their tendency to be late.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

There are eight million stories in the naked city, here are four…

Friday, 24 July, 2015

The things that go on in the house, or apartment, next door… Loop Ring Chop Drink, directed by Nicolas Ménard.

The mundane story of a heartbroken man, an online gambling addict, an alcoholic kleptomaniac, and an anxious loner living in the same apartment building.

Read more posts on related topics

, , ,

The end of syringe and needle injections? Here’s hoping…

Friday, 24 July, 2015

We may be about to see the end of vaccinations, and the like, being administered by syringe and needle. There is a now a small patch like object, made up of several hundred minute spikes, or needles, containing medicine, that painlessly dissolves into the skin. This I look forward to.

At first all the needles are sticking straight up, and by the end of the “injection”, the patch is completely smooth. The needles dissolve when they’re exposed to the water in your skin cells, and you’re vaccinated without any pain at all.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

A colourful visualisation of flights in and out of London in a day

Friday, 24 July, 2015

A colourful visualisation of aircraft traffic arriving and departing from the five major airports surrounding London. Apparently just about all of these flights, 99.8% of them, experience no ATC related delays. Not bad for what must be some of the busiest airspace in the world.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

The potato… the world’s most nondescript game changer?

Friday, 24 July, 2015

The potato, such a nondescript vegetable, yet it has played a surprisingly significant part in shaping the world we live in today.

Geographically, the Andes are an unlikely birthplace for a major staple crop. The longest mountain range on the planet, it forms an icy barrier on the Pacific Coast of South America 5,500 miles long and in many places more than 22,000 feet high. Active volcanoes scattered along its length are linked by geologic faults, which push against one another and trigger earthquakes, floods and landslides. Even when the land is seismically quiet, the Andean climate is active. Temperatures in the highlands can fluctuate from 75 degrees Fahrenheit to below freezing in a few hours – the air is too thin to hold the heat.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

The illustrated work of Niki Fisher

Thursday, 23 July, 2015

Illustration by Niki Fisher

The more you look at the work of Melbourne based designer and illustrator Niki Fisher, the more you see to like.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

Had to happen eventually… the Pluto conspiracy theories

Thursday, 23 July, 2015

There’s always someone trying to spoil everyone else’s fun, and only days after the New Horizons flyby of Pluto. Yes, the conspiracy theorists have started crawling out of the woodwork already.

One line of their… thinking on the matter says that the images returned to Earth last week were (somehow) faked, while another claims that an alien spaceship base was spotted on the distant member of the solar system, but was hushed up, and presumably, Photoshoped off, the images that NASA released.

A variant of the conspiracy theory exists that suggests that the NASA New Horizon mission happened and that it reached Pluto. However, the theory posits, the space agency is covering up the discovery of an alien, UFO base on the former ninth planet. Clearly a bone chilling orb at the edge of the Solar System would be prime real estate for such a facility, the better for the UFOs to make the occasional foray to Earth to abduct humans and perform disgusting experiments on them.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

Putting the bobsled track to good use during summer

Thursday, 23 July, 2015

What to do during the summer months, when there’s no snow on the local bobsled track? Ride your mountain bikes along it, of course.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

All those great photos of Pluto, thanks to an aluminum camera

Thursday, 23 July, 2015

To date, the photos of Pluto, its moons, and their surroundings, taken by the New Horizons space probe, have been breathtaking. But the story of the camera, named Ralph, responsible for all these images, is also incredible.

Obviously no ordinary camera could be used for the job, and the team constructing Ralph had to, among many other factors, consider the freezing conditions in which it would be operating.

And because the various materials that make up a normal camera would respond, or shrink, at different rates, due to the ultra low temperatures – we’re talking well below minus two hundred degrees Celsius here – it was decided to build Ralph almost entirely from aluminum.

With the exception of the lens, being glass, the aluminum construction meant that the camera’s components would all shrink at the same rate.

“Going out that far, there are some fluctuations,” Hardaway says. “It can get quite cold, and materials will shrink as they get colder. But different materials shrink at different rates.” The answer, then, was to build almost the entire camera out of just one type of material. “We actually built the mirrors and the chassis out of aluminum so that as they shrink, they would shrink together, to maintain the same focal length. We could do a reasonable test on Earth and still expect the same quality image,” she says.

Read more posts on related topics

, , ,