The time Andy Warhol interviewed Alfred Hitchcock

Friday, 6 June, 2014

US artist Andy Warhol interviewed British film director Alfred Hitchcock in 1974, for a piece that was published in Interview Magazine. Warhol claimed the prospect of meeting Hitchcock made him nervous, so maybe that’s why they only talked about murder….

Read more posts on related topics

, , ,

Two psychos are better than one when it comes to movie remakes?

Tuesday, 4 March, 2014

US film director Stephen Soderbergh has cut together Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 thriller/horror masterpiece Psycho, with Gus Van Sant’s not so well received 1998 remake, in an effort, possibly, to accentuate the best in both works.

If you have a spare ninety or so minutes take a look and see what you think. I’ve not seen Van Sant’s version, but it looks to be an exact – frame for frame – reproduction, which is a good thing as far as Soderbergh is concerned, his project may not have been possible otherwise.

Read more posts on related topics

, , ,

Restoring Alfred Hitchcock’s 1940 film “Foreign Correspondent”

Thursday, 27 February, 2014

Thanks to the efforts of film restorers, such as New York City based Criterion Collection, older, or classic, movies will continue to be available for decades to come. For an idea of how they work, watch their technicians remaster Alfred Hitchcock’s 1940 film, Foreign Correspondent.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

A horrifying thought, was Hitchcock’s “Psycho” meant to be comedy?

Thursday, 21 February, 2013

Alfred Hitchcock was apparently surprised that people saw his 1960 horror classic Psycho as anything other than comedy, according to a 1964 BBC interview that has recently come to light:

“The content was, I felt, rather amusing and it was a big joke,” Hitchcock explains in a new discovered tape from the BBC archives. “I was horrified to find some people took it seriously.”

Certainly its making bordered, at times, on farce if Hitchcock, the latest feature by Sacha Gervasi, is to be believed.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

Storyboards from thirteen films by Alfred Hitchcock

Friday, 19 October, 2012

One for Alfred Hitchcock fans, a collection of storyboards from thirteen of his films, including “Psycho”, “Vertigo”, and “The Birds”.

Read more posts on related topics

, , ,

Remixing “The Dark Knight” with the “Vertigo” soundtrack

Tuesday, 5 June, 2012

The bank robbery scene from The Dark Knight set to the music of Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo. Watch and see what you make of it. And not long now until the final instalment in the Christopher Nolan directed series of Batman films, The Dark Knight Rises, arrives (opens in Australian cinemas on 19 July 2012).

Read more posts on related topics

, , , ,

A bigger picture of the view from Hitchcock’s rear window

Friday, 6 April, 2012

Jeff Desom has stitched together individual scenes from Alfred Hitchcock’s 1954 thriller Rear Window to create a wider view of the scene viewable from L.B. Jefferies’ apartment. Watch for Hitchcock’s cameo at around the one minute ten second mark, on the righthand side.

Read more posts on related topics

, ,

Alfred Hitchcock on being happy, especially on a Monday

Monday, 26 March, 2012

A clear horizon and nothing to worry about… that’s how Alfred Hitchcock defines happiness. It’s a Monday, and it’s my first day back on deck after last week off. The more words of encouragement, the better.

Via Devour.

Read more posts on related topics

, , ,

Should we be in a spin over Vertigo’s soundtrack or would be name?

Friday, 3 February, 2012

Alfred Hitchcock’s 1958 film Vertigo has been in the news recently after lead actor Kim Novak criticised producers of The Artist for using segments of the soundtrack from the Hitchcock classic.

Even though the inclusion of the music originally written by Bernard Herrmann was sanctioned, it is nonetheless an action Novak considers to be a violation.

“Vertigo” meanwhile may have gone by a completely different name had Hitchcock not held out against film studio executives who had conceived of 47 alternative titles, including “Cry from the Rooftop”, “The Mask and the Face”, and “Steps on the Stairs” (yes…), that they would have preferred the film be known as.

Personally I thought the parts of the “Vertigo” soundtrack used in “The Artist” – which are unmissable by the way – were well placed. Having “Vertigo” go by a different name however would have been a real violation.

Read more posts on related topics

, , , ,

The film director who kept changing his movies too much

Tuesday, 27 September, 2011

If George Lucas, creator of the Star Wars sci-fi movie saga, is so intent on constantly altering his original work why doesn’t he remake the films instead, perhaps as Alfred Hitchcock did with “The Man Who Knew Too Much” in 1956, which he first made in 1934?

Of course the idea of re-writing, updating or altering is not new. Authors do it all the time, presenting a revised second edition and letting the first edition slip quietly out of print. Nor is the idea of re-working old material, it happens all the time, even with classics. Kate Bush did just that with her album Director’s Cut earlier this year. But in most cases enterprising fans can find a copy of the original version, or, if there’s enough consumer demand, original versions are made available by a publisher who will typically own the rights. Not so with Star Wars. The rights belong to George Lucas. But should they?

While remakes wouldn’t please everyone they would have allowed the originals to remain untouched, while fulfilling Lucas’ desire to realise his “original” vision in regards to the saga.

Read more posts on related topics

, , , , ,