Drawing every person in New York, I guess that’s possible…

Friday, 19 June, 2015

New York City artist and illustrator Jason Polan has set himself an incredibly ambitious goal… to draw every person, that’s about eight and a half million people, in the city. There’s in the order of three and a half thousand people in the town where I’m writing this, and even drawing that number of people would seem like a monumental challenge.

I am trying to draw every person in New York. I will be drawing people everyday and posting as frequently as I can. It is possible that I will draw you without you knowing it. I draw in Subway stations and museums and restaurants and on street corners. I try not to be in the way when I am drawing or be too noticeable.

You can keep tabs on Polan’s progress here, where he posts his work.

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How do you make a grain of rice shine? By Rice Mapping, that’s how

Thursday, 18 June, 2015

We’re probably more used to projections being cast onto larger surfaces. Cinema screens. Whiteboards. Or in the case of, say, Vivid Sydney, buildings, and whatever other structures, that projected light and images can shine onto.

How about something a little smaller though? Such as a grain of rice? Couldn’t possibly happen? If you think that, then you’ve obviously not heard of Rice Mapping

In Japan, rice is more than a mere food source. It has spiritual significance for the Japanese due to its use as an offering to deities in rituals and ceremonies. We took on the challenge of distilling Japanese aesthetics onto this cultural symbol. We created the world’s smallest projection mapping that brings together Japan’s ancient values and state-of-the-art technology. As it is being viewed, the texture of the “rice” begins to change so that it is no longer just rice.

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The cyclists, and heritage buildings, of Sydney in watercolour

Wednesday, 17 June, 2015

Artwork by Dtai Hansathit

To me, watercolour paintings are a memento of a simpler, bygone, time. And maybe that’s the way it should be, the technique takes its origins from the Paleolithic age after all. That’s not to say watercolour artworks don’t cut it in today’s world. Far from it.

Dtai Hansathit is a Sydney based watercolour artist, who takes inspiration from cycling, and the city’s older buildings and houses, such as the establishment seen above, a place I’ve been to one or twice before. Many more works can be seen on Instagram.

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Recreate your own photos and paintings with LEGO bricks

Friday, 12 June, 2015

Marco Sodano is one artist who creates artworks, based on well known portrait paintings, using LEGO bricks. If you’d like to have a try, Legoizer could be for you. Upload a photo that you wish to recreate with LEGO bricks, and Legoizer will return a list of the sorts of bricks, and their colours, that you’ll need.

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Penguins see you, penguins do as you do

Thursday, 11 June, 2015

Penguins Mirror is an interactive mechanical mirror, by New York based artist Daniel Rozin, made up of 450 motorised toy penguins, that replicates whatever pose you make while standing in front of it.

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Could time travel play a part in get-rich-quick-schemes?

Tuesday, 9 June, 2015

An age old question, in the making at least, how to best profit from a time machine. In this instance, you can take something of value from the present, somewhere into the past, and exchange it for something that stands to become valuable later on.

Something like the Mona Lisa, painted during the early years of the sixteen century, by Leonardo da Vinci, makes a good example to work with here. Only problem is, if da Vinci, or the Gherardini family, who commissioned the work, were prepared to part with the portrait, what could you offer them as payment?

Latter day cash would hardly seal the deal, but gold might suffice. Buying the painting legitimately five hundred years may be one thing, but proving your ownership of it in the twenty-first century might be another matter all together.

The problem is establishing clear title to the painting, once you got back home. It wouldn’t turn up on any register as stolen, but still you would spend a lot of time talking to the FBI and Interpol. The IRS would want to know whether this was a long-term or short-term capital gain, and you couldn’t just cite Einstein back to them. They also would think you must have had a lot of unreported back income.

So much for that as a get rich fast scheme. It might just be better to visit your younger self, and have them bet on the outcome of horse races, football games, and the like. You won’t need a fancy sports almanac either, you should be able to find the results and scores you need by way of a good search engine.

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Here are a few photos we took while holidaying on Mars

Monday, 8 June, 2015

Is this photo collection, by Paris based photographer Julien Mauve, indicative of the sort of snaps we ourselves may take, if Mars ever becomes a – and so much for one way trips there – tourist destination?

Be sure to check out some of Mauve’s other work as well, such as Hopeless Romantic, and also After Lights Out, that I linked to last year.

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Taking a whole new brush to the painting by numbers concept

Friday, 5 June, 2015

Querkles, as devised by Melbourne based graphic designer Thomas Pavitte, takes the painting by numbers concept, and all too literally paints it with a new brush…

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This you must see, the photography of Potato Unit

Thursday, 4 June, 2015

Photo by Potato Unit

I’m loving the work of San Jose based photographer Wayne, also known as Potato Unit, or should that be potatounit? Many more images to be found on Instagram also.

Via Design is Kinky.

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The hole-in-the-wall art gallery I found during a scavenger hunt

Thursday, 4 June, 2015

Photo by Erica Ciccarone

A scavenger hunt to find works of art? That’s a new one on me, that much is certain. That’s what you can do though if you’re in Nashville, capital of US state Tennessee. The scavenger hunt is but part of the attraction however, and you’ll need to keep your eyes open as the works themselves are no larger than a brick.

It’s an idea that came to local artist Ben Griffith during a visit to a nearby cafe, when he noticed something unusual in the wall of the building:

One day he noticed half a brick missing in the coffee house wall. The staff had started putting little things in it: a little table, a portrait of someone, an alien figurine. “The moment I saw it,” Griffith says, “I went home and painted a tiny little piece and made a tiny little frame and put it in there without asking.”

I could see this idea catching on…

Via Hypnophant.

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