The paintings of Karin Jurick, she who watches the art watchers

Tuesday, 30 August, 2016

Artwork by Karin Jurick

Ever had the feeling you were being watched, while looking at paintings in an art gallery? If so, it could be you were a subject of Atlanta artist Karin Jurick, and are featured in a series of her works of people looking at, you guessed it, paintings in art galleries.

See more of Jurick’s works from this series here, and other of her paintings here.

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The hand cut lettering work of Annie Vought

Tuesday, 30 August, 2016

Artwork by Annie Vought

You have to admire the tenacity of Oakland based, US artist, Annie Vought.

Each of her artworks are painstakingly cut out shape by shape, or letter by letter, and we’re talking letters that might have a font size of twelve points. On top of that, these aren’t notepad size works. One of them, titled, Gosh I’ve been here before, is over a square metre in size.

See more of Vought’s work on her Instagram page.

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Adipocere, a hand embroidery artist who stitches on his own hand

Monday, 29 August, 2016

Embroidery/artwork by Adipocere

Melbourne based embroidery artist, Adipocere, is not only masterful with a needle and cotton, he also writes a striking elevator pitch, in describing his work: “hand embroidery almost exclusively on natural linen, occasionally on human skin.” If it wasn’t for those last four words; occasionally on human skin, I might have missed his work all together.

Embroidery/artwork by Adipocere

And I’m glad that didn’t happen, because this is no ordinary needlework. You’re not going to see fabrics adorned with colourful flowers swaying in green meadows, or birds perched gracefully upon branches. No, the work of Adipocere, who is also known as Josh, could be best described as otherworldly. Think also of menacing black cats, and the occult.

Embroidery/artwork by Adipocere

Dark, and macabre, are other words that come to mind. Especially after looking at works depicting felines feasting on disembowelled corpses. Or the grim reaper posing as the pied piper. Or skulls, and fragments of skulls. Morbid stuff indeed, but ironically Adipocere – the meaning of his pseudonym notwithstanding – often sees his work as comical.

Embroidery/artwork by Adipocere

But back to that line about human skin. What’s up there? Surely Adipocere isn’t a body artist, who uses needles as a tattooist does, to etch, or stitch, his creations into human flesh? Well, yes, he does, but only on his body. Several times now, he has stitched designs onto his own hand, and “enjoy”, and “not unpleasant”, were phrases he used to describe the experience.

Embroidery/artwork by Adipocere

I could say that such a response surprised me, but it doesn’t really. And, all things considered, why should it? Further, and at the risk of being hackneyed, I could say this is work that gives new meaning to the term hand embroidery. More of Adipocere’s work, some of which is mildly NSFW, can be found on his website, and his Instagram page.

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Matthew Willey, an artist out to paint fifty-thousand honeybees

Monday, 29 August, 2016

Photo by Matthew Willey

According to the website of US artist Matthew Willey, a healthy, thriving bee hive has a population of fifty-thousand honeybees. And that is the number of bees he has decided to paint, on whatever surface is available, be it a wall, inside or out, or the side of a building.

Check out his efforts to date here, and on Instagram. It seems to me he has painted a lot of bees by now, but I suspect there is a way to go before reaching the fifty-thousand mark.

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Weronika Gesicka, a photographer turning old stock photos into art

Monday, 29 August, 2016

Photo/artwork by Weronika Gesicka

After searching through stock photo images dating from the 1950s and 1960s, and then altering them with the aid of Photoshop, Polish artist and photographer Weronika Gesicka has assembled a photo series titled Traces, that could be variously be described as outlandish, or eerie, or plain strange.

Weird the work might be, but wonderful it is as well.

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I only travel on Berlin’s U-Bahn train network to see the mosaics

Monday, 29 August, 2016

Photo by Claudio Galamini

I ought to pay more attention to my surroundings when I travel by train. Usually, I rush into a station, running late as usual, and spend the time on the platform either watching out for the train to arrive, or looking at my smartphone.

While it’s probably not all that likely along the lines I use, some train stations boast some fantastic mosaic and tile pattern designs. Stations on Berlin’s train network, the U-Bahn, are a fine example, as this collection of photos, taken by Claudio Galamini, show.

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A world dominated by books, illustrations by Jungho Lee

Thursday, 25 August, 2016

Illustration by Jungho Lee

Don’t write off books yet. The paper ones, that is. In the world of Jungho Lee, a Seoul based artist and illustrator, they are omnipresent. The books here have re-purposed themselves, and it will be a long time before they become obsolete…

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Sunga Park’s surreal watercolour paintings of European buildings

Thursday, 25 August, 2016

Painting by Sunga Park

Sunga Park, a Bangkok based illustrator and graphic designer, is also an accomplished watercolour painter. Inspired by her travels in Europe, she has produced a dreamlike collection of works depicting some of the buildings she has seen there.

More of her work can be seen on Behance, and Instagram.

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Valerio D’Ospina, painting the motion of the city streets

Monday, 22 August, 2016

Artwork by Valerio D'Ospina

The blurred lines of the sometimes brooding artworks of Italian artist Valerio D’Ospina, give the viewer a sense of being in motion, as if they were running, or a driving a car, along a city street that he has painted.

Their proportions might also aid this illusion, some of D’Ospina’s canvases are up to two metres in height. Here is footage of him working on a generous sized painting of a docked cargo ship, over the course of a day.

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And now for some recent book cover designs

Friday, 19 August, 2016

I don’t read books, I only look at the design of their covers. That’s not quite correct, but sometimes it can be hard to go passed a good book cover. Anyway, here’s a selection of book covers from titles that have been published in the last month or so.

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