Book covers that really rock

Thursday, 8 May, 2014

album cover, book cover

Classic CD album covers re-imagined as Pelican books… I did mention this collection about five years ago, but since a reader emailed the link last week, I thought it worth another airing.

(Thanks Lilly)

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Spoilers for just about every book ever published

Friday, 11 April, 2014

Tired of people offering up unwelcome spoilers for films and TV shows? If said persons are book readers there may be a way to get a little of your own back though, by way of this reasonably extensive list of book spoilers.

Published on 1 April I know, but I believe the… summaries are accurate. For the most part anyway.

Via Hynophant.

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Eternity is a long time to spend writing Harry Potter books

Monday, 10 March, 2014

By applying a differing interpretation to the prophecy that either Harry Potter, or his nemesis Voldemort, must kill the other in order to survive, could mean that the only one way either can actually die, is to be killed by the other.

As we know one did in fact kill the other (I’ll refrain from giving away the ending away on the off chance you still don’t know what happened…), meaning the survivor is now immortal. Well, that’s one take on the wording of prophecy in any event.

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Is it code? Is it a joke? The 600 year old book that poses a puzzle

Monday, 10 March, 2014

A book, known as the Voynich manuscript, thought to have been published in the fifteenth century, has thus far baffled those trying to make sense of it. Cryptographers, and even codebreakers working during World Wars I and II, remain stumped.

Since the manuscript was brought to the public’s attention in 1912 – when antique book collector Wilfrid Voynich bought it in Italy – experts from a range of fields have tried their hardest to make sense of it. Cryptographers have tried to crack its code; linguists have tried to decipher its base language. Botanists have identified the plants sketched within its aged pages and attempted to cross-reference their ancient and modern names.

It may not be as mysterious as is believed though… some experts are of the opinion that the writings could in fact be gibberish.

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Are Moby Dick’s whales still swimming in the oceans today?

Tuesday, 25 February, 2014

Herman Melville’s novel “Moby Dick” was written in 1851. That’s one hundred and sixty three years ago. What’s incredible here though is that some of the whales swimming about in the oceans today, were swimming about in the oceans before Melville’s book was even published.

Another addition to the true facts that sound false list maybe?

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For book readers, a bucket list with one hundred titles

Friday, 21 February, 2014

If you like books and bucket lists, then this list of one hundred books to read in a lifetime, put together by Amazon, is for you.

I’m hoping that having seen the film adaptation of some of the books that feature here counts…

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Analysing the words used in certain series of well known novels

Thursday, 28 November, 2013

For those with an interest in such things, listings of the most distinct, and commonly used adjectives, adverbs, and sentences used in the fantasy/adventure “Hunger Games”, “Harry Potter”, and “Twilight”, series of novels.

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Search engine beta: the bricks, mortar, and paper, working version

Thursday, 28 November, 2013

Old Cincinnati library

Possibly the Old Main Library in the US city of Cincinnati, that closed in 1955, formed the basis of today’s search engines… what does anyone else think?

Via History In Pictures.

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The one hundred best novels ever published… as of 1898

Thursday, 14 November, 2013

In 1898 British writer and critic Clement K. Shorter published a list of the then one hundred best novels ever written. “Don Quixote”, “Robinson Crusoe”, “Pride and Prejudice”, “Frankenstein”, and “The Three Musketeers”, to name a few, were among books making the cut.

I haven’t read every last title on the list, but certainly many are familiar nonetheless. Shorter clearly knew a good book when he saw one… even if you may not agree with all his choices.

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The reading list of David Bowie

Wednesday, 9 October, 2013

Looking for reading ideas for the upcoming spring/autumn break, if applicable, or going further ahead, year-end holidays? Maybe a few titles from David Bowie’s must read book list then?

The reading list, with books presented in chronological order rather than order of preference, provides Ontario with a new angle. American classics of the 50s and 60s are strongly represented – On the Road by Jack Kerouac, Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood – as are tales of working-class boys made good, which emerged in the postwar years: Keith Waterhouse’s Billy Liar and Room at the Top by John Braine, and The Outsider by Colin Wilson, a study of creativity and the mindset of misfits. RD Laing’s The Divided Self speaks to a fascination with psychotherapy and creativity, as does The Origin of Consciousness in the breakdown of the Bicameral Mind, by Julian Jaynes. There is no evidence that Bowie’s scientific inquries extend beyond psychology – Stephen Hawking’s cosmic theories are out – but his tastes are otherwise broad.

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