For The Love Of Spock, Leonard Nimoy’s life documented

Tuesday, 26 July, 2016

For The Love Of Spock is a documentary about the life of Leonard Nimoy, who is possibly better known to more people as Mr Spock from the original Star Trek TV series, that first aired fifty years ago. Directed by Nimoy’s son, Adam, For The Love Of Spock looks at his work and life.

The trailer is now online, and the film itself is slated for release in early September, this year. It looks like just about everyone who had any involvement with Star Trek, including the later TV series, and movies, will be featured.

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The Stanley Kubrick Exhibition, San Francisco

Wednesday, 20 July, 2016

How many people would ever wonder, even for an instant, whether the tools and equipment, the papers and the books, they worked with during their lives, would ever end up as part of a museum display, or an exhibition?

I wonder if Stanley Kubrick might have had such a thought? Would he ever have envisaged The Stanley Kubrick Exhibition, currently taking place in San Francisco?

For those of us with an interest in Kubrick and his work though, the show is surely a boon, but if you’re unable to attend, this video tour of the San Francisco show, hosted by Adam Savage, will give you an idea of what it’s about.

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A list of US made films that aren’t big budget blockbusters

Tuesday, 19 July, 2016

Looks interesting, a list of thirty US made films that you may not have heard about, that Taste of Cinema writer Matt Hendricks thinks are worth seeking out, and watching.

Present-day audiences pretty much wait for the next theatrical releases from Tarantino, Scorsese, Fincher, David O. Russell, anything owned by Disney, and anything associated with Batman while ignoring just about everything else out there. Consequently, it’s quite easy to think America’s cinematic culture is quickly going down the tubes. While there’s no denying that it is, it’s just not as quickly or as obviously as one might think. To explain further, there actually isn’t a shortage of good movies out there. In fact, there is such an abundance of them that it has become easier for us to write them off than it is to make the effort, do a little reading, and seek them out.

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A bad day in space, but a good day for sci-fi film fans

Tuesday, 21 June, 2016

Space Story: A Bad Day, by Luc Bergeron, a compilation of scenes from numerous sci-fi films, cut together to tell a new story. I wonder if a sequel is on the way?

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Alone, or with others, there’s no beating the movie experience

Monday, 23 May, 2016

Chris Randle, writing for The New York Times Magazine, makes the case for going to the movies alone. Or, more the case perhaps, going along full-stop, whether by yourself, or with others.

Yet part of me loves meeting these unknowable visitors, just as I love darting inside a theater midsummer, pretending for two hours that the sun and its demands no longer exist. The mood of the room inducts you to its conspiracy. I would never shush that father and daughter softly discussing what’s onscreen, even the plastic-bag crinklers, because they’ve granted me license, too. When each stranger fades to a half-presence in the darkness, you’re alone with your feelings yet unable to hide them, a reflective exhibitionist. At Manhattan’s long-gone Bleecker Street Cinema, the house cat Breathless would often escape the office and claw its way up the screen, encouraged by cheers.

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Massive is a world inhabited by giant people

Monday, 16 May, 2016

Massive, a video art piece by Dan Chen, imagines a world that is inhabited by giant people.

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If a film is thirty days in length, how long should the trailer be?

Thursday, 21 April, 2016

Ambiancé is, so far, the only movie that Swedish filmmaker Anders Weberg has to his name. But given that the documentary has a run time of seven hundred and twenty hours long, or thirty days, I can see why he’s had no time for any other film projects.

The film’s trailer clocks in at about seven hours, so if you have some spare time this weekend, or are going to be on a long flight, you might be able to look at that first.

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And the winner of the Oscar, I mean the Presidency, is…

Wednesday, 13 April, 2016

The movie preferences of front runners in this year’s US presidential election. Imagine choosing someone for high office based solely on the films they like? If it were me, and looking at the films the candidates have nominated, it would be a tough choice between Hillary Clinton, and uh oh, Donald Trump.

Clinton likes Casablanca and Out of Africa, while Trump favours Citizen Kane and The Godfather.

Then again The Big Short, something that Bernie Sanders suggested, wasn’t too bad, but it was the only title he appeared to offer. That may not be enough to win the presidency?

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Forget film school, learn to direct by watching these 87 movies

Friday, 18 March, 2016

There’s eighty seven films you need to see if you wish to become a filmmaker, says US film director Spike Lee. Entries on his list include Rear Window and Vertigo by Alfred Hitchcock, Raising Arizona by the Coen Brothers, Mad Max by George Miller, Some Like it Hot by Billy Wilder, and Lawrence Of Arabia by David Lean.

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Exactly how accurate is the IMDb’s Top 250 films list?

Thursday, 10 March, 2016

The Internet Movie Database or IMDb, is my go-to resource for all things film, but it seems some of the information on offer may not be entirely bona fide.

For instance, the way that titles featuring on their Top 250 films list, are ranked, is one aspect in particular that has generated much discussion over the years, leading some people to wonder just how indicative the list really is of the preferences of global film audiences.

But they don’t disclose how many votes you need in order to qualify as a “regular” voter. (In the FAQ, they write: “To maintain the effectiveness of the Top 250 Rated Charts, we deliberately do not and will not disclose the criteria used for a person to be counted as a regular voter.”) In some ways, this maintains some integrity in The Top 250, as it’s much harder to create duplicate dummy accounts and get away with ballot-stuffing. But, it also means the votes of casual fans or people who are too busy to engage as much (including the busy industry professionals who have better things to do) are not included in the rankings, even if they make a few of them.

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