The original “Star Trek” in the widescreen

Friday, 19 September, 2014

Star Trek widescreen by Nick Acosta

San Francisco based illustrator and concept artist Nick Acosta has created a series of images depicting scenes from the orginal “Star Trek” television show, that, by the way, first went to air forty-eight years ago, in widescreen format. This I could get into I think…

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“Apocalypse Now”… starring Winnie the Pooh

Thursday, 18 September, 2014

A re-mix of Francis Ford Coppola’s 1979 war epic Apocalypse Now featuring characters from the “Winnie the Pooh” stories. It’s not like Apocalypse Pooh is new either, it was made by Todd Graham in 1987, and was re-mastered a few years ago. The things you learn…

Via Kottke.

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Wish I Was Here

Tuesday, 16 September, 2014

3 stars
Wish I Was Here scene

Would be actor Aiden (Zach Braff) is someone who could never quite see the world for what it was, preferring to think he made his way through life as some sort of action hero. After his father, Gabe (Mandy Patinkin), reveals he is gravely ill though, Aiden is forced to reassess his lot, in Wish I Was Here, trailer, also directed by Braff.

Not only must Aiden change his attitude, he must also bring his socially inept, and reclusive, brother Noah (Josh Gad), around to the situation. At the same time he also takes on role of home teacher to daughter Grace (Joey King), and son Tucker (Pierce Gagnon), after Aiden and his wife, Sarah (Kate Hudson), decide they can no longer afford their school fees.

As a coming of age story for thirty-something adults, “Wish I Was Here” makes a promising start, and certainly has its humorous moments. In trying to take on a number of issues though, religion, purpose in life, quality of school education, among others, it ends up spreading itself a little too thinly, and lacks focus as a result.

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One hundred iconic movie scenes

Tuesday, 16 September, 2014

One hundred of the best, or most memorable, scenes from films of the last one hundred years or so. In case you don’t recognise everything, here is a list of each scene.

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The original soundtrack of 2001, as composed by Alex North

Wednesday, 10 September, 2014

I knew that Stanley Kubrick spent a lot of time thinking about the music for his 1968 feature 2001: A Space Odyssey, but I didn’t for a long time realise that US composer Alex North had been commissioned to write an entire sound track that Kubrick later opted not to use.

North’s composition, in its entirety, can be found here. What do you think? While, for instance, I like “Space Station Docking” by North, that would have featured during the flight to the space station, there’s no going passed Kubrick’s ultimate choice, “The Blue Danube”.

Via things magazine.

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Some of the movies I’ve seen but not written about

Monday, 8 September, 2014

Work has been a little backed up at the disassociated studio in recent weeks, as the absence of film reviews may attest to. I haven’t quite bitten off more than I can chew through, but things are definitely a little busier at the moment. C’est la vie?

Anyway I’m still getting out and seeing movies, but instead of something more extensive, here’s a quick rundown of a few that I’ve seen.

Boyhood (trailer) traces the life of Mason (Ellar Coltrane) from age six through to eighteen. It runs for just over two and a half hours, as you could imagine, but really pays out in the final fifteen or so minutes.

A Most Wanted Man, one of Philip Seymour Hoffman’s final roles, is an action thriller devoid of a single gun shot or car chase. That’s what I call great storytelling. Magic in the Moonlight, meanwhile, feature number forty-four from Woody Allen was a little flat, while Palo Alto reveals a side of the well known US city many of us may not be conversant with.

Snowpiercer is a futuristic sci-fi story about a train carrying what remains of humanity in an endless loop around the world, after the globe froze over, and then there’s 20,000 Days on Earth, a documentary about Australian alternative (if that’s the best word to use…) musician Nick Cave.

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The editing work of late Japanese filmmaker Satoshi Kon

Thursday, 4 September, 2014

A look at the influential editing work, in particular scene transitions, of late Japanese filmmaker and animator Satoshi Kon. You may not have seen many of Kon’s features, but chances are you’ve seen his techniques used by other directors though.

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For your viewing pleasure, five of North Korea’s best films

Wednesday, 3 September, 2014

Film is probably not one thing too many people think of when North Korea comes to mind, but just because your local cinema may not feature a great many productions from the Hermit Kingdom, doesn’t mean the country is without a film industry.

Far from it, and anyone who cares to trawl about online will likely unearth numerous North Korean produced titles. Simon Fowler, a film critic, and author of North Korean Films, recently compiled a list of what he considers to be the country’s five best movies.

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Preserving the “Star Wars” Expanded Universe exactly the way it was

Monday, 1 September, 2014

The “Star Wars” Expanded Universe, or EU, is a vast collection of books, comics, and video games, that feature many of the saga’s original characters, in, for want of a better term, side-line stories, that relate in varying degrees to events of the six “Star Wars” films released to date.

Not all of these stories however were entirely peripheral, given George Lucas stated long ago he would not ever film the final three segments of the saga, episodes seven to nine, the EU had come along and picked up the slack as it were, and carried on the adventures of Luke, Leia, Han, and company.

In April however it was announced that the EU was effectively going by the wayside, and that for the most part the characters and developments it had given rise to, would not be part of the forthcoming Disney produced series of films.

This may not be as distressing as it seems, as it will allow for the creation of new story arcs, and add a little intrigue to the upcoming films.

For those who would rather adhere to the EU’s vision of the “Star Wars” future though, Rich McCormick, a writer for The Verge, has put together a timeline of significant events that take place following Return of the Jedi.

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Movie props that deserve a place on the credit roll

Thursday, 21 August, 2014

If you’re a keen movie watcher, look a little more closely at the films you see… it’s possible you may notice the exact same props featuring in numerous, often unrelated, titles.

One such item is a newspaper that has been seen in several films. While it may seem absurd that producers would rather use a surely expensive prop rather than fork out two dollars, or whatever it costs, to buy a paper, there is actually a good reason for doing so:

According to Slate, the newspaper is from a small prop company in Sun Valley, California called the Earl Hays Press and was first printed in the 1960s. Movie and TV productions keep using the same prop newspaper because it’s actually cheaper to pay $15 per prop than get legal clearance from an up-to-date New York Times or other real-life newspaper.

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