Stonehenge is but one of many such megalithic stone structures

Monday, 7 July, 2014

New York City based visual artist and photographer Barbara Yoshida has travelled around Britain, Europe, and the Mediterranean region, taking pictures of ancient megalithic stone structures that are similar to, but perhaps not as well known as, Stonehenge.

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Would equations be more interesting if rendered as 3D models?

Thursday, 3 July, 2014

Maths model, UIUC Altgeld collection

I don’t spend a great deal of time trying to visual maths equations, that would be way too bamboozling for me, but were they to be rendered as three dimensional models, that might be another matter.

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Family photos of the passage of time

Thursday, 3 July, 2014

In 1991 London based photographer Zed Nelson started taking a photo each year of a friend, and his family, until 2012. More of these sorts of photo collections – that span years and decades – seem to keep coming to light, but that doesn’t make them any less interesting.

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Vincent Brady’s Planetary Panoramas

Wednesday, 2 July, 2014

Mind-boggling and awe-inspiring, are probably the best ways to describe Vincent Brady’s Planetary Panoramas photo time lapse series of the night sky.

Via MetaFilter.

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The world’s biggest hole probably has to be an open pit mine

Wednesday, 2 July, 2014

At a depth of 1500 feet, about 500 metres, and spread over thirty-five square kilometres, the Hambach open cast coal mine in Germany, is one of the largest man made holes on the planet, and is the subject of a photo series by Munich based photographer Bernhard Lang.

For the sake of reference, rather than any attempt to play catch up as it were, the Super Pit gold mine, or Fimiston Open Pit, in Kalgoorlie, Western Australia, is said to be the biggest open pit mine in this part of the world.

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The camera never lies, this is what agency life is really like

Friday, 27 June, 2014

Photo by Derrick Lin

Ohio based brand strategist Derrick Lin’s camera seems to capture moments the eye misses… I somehow get the feeling that you’d see – were it possible of course – scenes such as these in many workplaces though, not just a digital agency.

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The best images from the 2014 iPhone Photography Awards

Friday, 20 June, 2014

Photo by Erika Brothers

The images rendered by smartphone cameras, in this case, iPhones, are right up there with the best of them, as the winning entries in this year’s iPhone Photography Awards can attest to.

(Above photo by Erika Brothers)

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Abandoned places, as photographed by Joe Reifer

Thursday, 19 June, 2014

Photo by Joe Reifer

Joe Reifer, a San Francisco based night photographer, also has a liking for abandoned places… his intriguing, yet mildly foreboding, portfolio includes motels, ski fields, farms, scrap metal yards, military bases, and of course ghost towns.

Via Hypnophant.

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The patterns of planet Earth

Wednesday, 18 June, 2014

Photo via Google Maps

Whereas Lauren O’Neill looks through Google Earth images seeking aerial views of airports, Lauren Manning goes in search of “spectacular satellite images” of the planet, on Google Maps.

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Are the 17th century paintings of Johannes Vermeer photos?

Tuesday, 17 June, 2014

The work of seventeenth century painter Johannes Vermeer has intrigued Texas-based inventor Tim Jenison, who thinks the Dutch artist may have used a device such as the camera obscura, in the course of his work, so photo-like are some of his paintings:

The way Vermeer painted this wall is consistent with a photograph. It is not consistent with human vision. If you were standing in the room that Vermeer painted, you would see that wall as a pretty even shade of off-white. The retina in your eyeball does some image processing to minimize the effect of light and shadow. To your eye, the wall appears to have far less contrast than it actually has. And if you can’t see it, you can’t paint it. But Vermeer, unlike other painters, painted his walls the way a photographic camera would record it.

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