One thousand new photos of Mars’ incredibly varied surface

Friday, 12 August, 2016

Mars surface, photo by MRO, NASA

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has been in orbit around the red planet since March 2006, where it has been taking photos of the surface ever since. Recently NASA released just over one thousand of these images, taken in the last few months.

Mars surface, photo by MRO, NASA

I think its fair to say the photos reveal a planet with an incredibly diverse surface. A case in point has to be both of these photos. The top picture is of a region near the North Pole. The second is of an area in the Southern Highlands. More images can be seen here.

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See Tokyo in a new a light, a pink light, to be precise

Thursday, 11 August, 2016

Photo by Xavier Portela

Following a recent visit to the Japanese capital, Tokyo, Brussels based freelance photographer, and filmmaker, Xavier Portela was looking for a way to capture the spirit, or energy, that visitors might experience when they first arrive there.

Photo by Xavier Portela

I think there’s little doubting that the pink saturation that he applies to the photos he took, renders the desired effect.

Photo by Xavier Portela

See more of the photos in the series, titled “Tokyo’s Glow” at designboom.

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Photos of films in a single long exposure image by Jason Shulman

Wednesday, 10 August, 2016

Photo by Jason Shulman

Is it an abstract? Is it a watercolour? No, it’s a photo of a film. An entire film. A film called A Trip to the Moon, in this case, that was made in 1902.

Photo by Jason Shulman

It’s part of a project, the aptly named Photographs of Films, by London based sculptor and photographer Jason Shulman. Curious as to what might result if he took a long exposure photo of a film as it played, Shulman decided to find out.

Photo by Jason Shulman

Aren’t the final images intriguing though? The second/middle image here is of 1968’s, Yellow Submarine, while the third, that I recognised immediately, is 2001: A Space Odyssey.

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Meanest Indian, the graphic design of, and photography from, India

Wednesday, 10 August, 2016

Photo by Meena Kadri

If you like India, street signage, and graphic design, then you’re going to love the Flickr page, titled Meanest Indian, of New Zealand based designer Meena Kadri.

Photo by Meena Kadri

I don’t think it matters where you point a camera in India, there’s always a photogenic subject right in front of you. That’s what I thought after looking at these images, anyway.

Photo by Meena Kadri

Via Messy Nessy Chic.

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Photos of Portugal by Paulo Furtado, many great photos of Portugal

Tuesday, 9 August, 2016

Photo by Paulo Furtado

Paulo Furtado is a photographer based in the Portuguese city of Vila Nova de Gaia, near Porto. I once spent two months in Portugal, and would love to be able to travel around the country taking photos, as he does. Maybe one day.

Photo by Paulo Furtado

Many more photos of Portugal can be seen here.

Photo by Paulo Furtado

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There’s no airline food like old school airline food

Tuesday, 9 August, 2016

There’s very likely a reason latter day air travellers don’t like airline food, that’s because they don’t cook it, or for that matter, serve it, the way they used to. Check out these photos on the Flickr page of SAS Museet, or museum of Scandinavian Airlines, of the way things used to be.

Could you even imagine having a meal served this way on a regular commercial flight? No, I doubt it’s a sight we’ll see again.

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A fake funeral, a new way to help you appreciate your life?

Monday, 8 August, 2016

Some people fake their deaths in an attempt to, say, start a new life, or escape heavy debts. South Koreans, however, do things a little differently.

They attend mock funerals for themselves, complete with an eulogy they wrote, and coffins that they lie in for a short time. The exercise gives participants the chance to reflect on their lives, and give thought to their eventual – real – deaths.

The program, led by Mr. Kim Ki-ho brings participants together to reflect on their lives by experiencing their own fake funeral. They write their own eulogies, make out mock wills, and pen farewell notes. Then, they dress in traditional burial linens, climb into coffins in a darkened room, and meditate on their lives for 30 minutes. Responses vary, but many said that acting out their own deaths made them appreciate their lives more, and to consider the consequences of their deaths more seriously.

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Lars Schneider, landscape photographer

Monday, 8 August, 2016

Lars Schneider, of Hamburg, Germany, when he’s not elsewhere in the world for up to six months a year, that is, talks about life and work as a landscape photographer. Work that entails finding a good angle, and taking a photo? If only it were so straightforward.

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The camera makes us look heavier, and the camera never lies, right?

Wednesday, 3 August, 2016

Photography by Dan Vojtech

Does the camera really make us appear heavier than we actually are? A sequence of images, by Prague based photographer Dan Vojtech, where focal lengths used to take photos of a subject’s face varied between twenty millimetres to two hundred millimetres, suggests so.

The human eye would perceive vision at a focal length of about thirty to fifty millimetres, so I guess that forms the baseline for “normal”. Focal lengths above or below that range might therefore appear to make the subject look bigger, or smaller, as the case may be.

Via Digg.

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The other, lesser seen, sides of famous landmarks and locations

Tuesday, 2 August, 2016

Photo by Oliver Curtis

I love this set of photos by British photographer Oliver Curtis, of the view facing away – in an opposite direction perhaps – from a well known landmark. I’ve been to the Wailing Wall, also known as the Western Wall, in Jerusalem, but don’t recall paying much heed to what was behind me. Now I know what I missed out on.

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