I must not fear. Words to live by when you work as a highliner

Friday, 16 September, 2016

I must not fear. Fear is the mind killer. These are the words of Utah based athlete and professional highliner Hayley Ashburn, who you can see here crossing a fifty-two metre highline, between the Vajolet Towers in Italy. Those are words to live by for all us, but especially for people in her line of work.

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Master the art of smoke and mirrors and you will be a great designer

Monday, 12 September, 2016

My career as a web designer might have lasted a whole lot longer, had I have heeded what San Francisco based designer Pablo Stanley, had to say:

Never mind that part of your job is making things easy to understand. Use phrases like “A holistic approach” or “brand storytelling” or other jargon that will keep people scratching their heads, afraid to ask what that even means. The more buzzwords you use, the less you have to explain your actual design thinking.

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Get out of your own prison, it’s Monday morning after all

Monday, 12 September, 2016

Since matters productivity and motivation are often on my mind on a Monday morning. To get anywhere, one must go with the flow of the universe. Yes, there is such a thing, except I often seem to find myself trying to resist it.

Best you read David Ams‘ article, than take too much notice of what I’m saying though.

You don’t have to think, if you feel it’s the right thing to do, just do it. You don’t have to know every steps of the way, just go for it. If it’s in alignment with your true self, the universe will conspire to help you in your path. Once again, you don’t have to know “how”, just take the leap, have the vision, and let life do what it does best. Look at nature, everything is accomplished, everything is perfect, yet no elements resist to what is.

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That person who isn’t on Facebook? There’s a name for them…

Friday, 9 September, 2016

Oh dear, the people who refuse to move with the times. Embrace social media. Or buy a smartphone. Things like that. There’s a name for these “holdouts”, that isn’t pretty, according to Stephanie Buck, writing for Timeline:

Laggards likely don’t start out being ironic. One trait that this group tends to share is skepticism, which is linked to “processing fluency,” the ease with which our brains can handle change or challenge. “While skepticism can generally be regarded as a very healthy,” says Enrique Dans, Professor of Innovation at IE Business School in Madrid, “truth is that most skeptics don’t go the extra mile to validate new ideas, and just become skeptics because they just refuse to get additional experience or information.”

I doubt that not having a Facebook page is a crime. However, I don’t think the group of people who go without an email account, or won’t buy goods and services online, needs to be as large as it might be. Some of these technologies have been around for decades now. It’s not as if anyone can feel as if they’re railing against something “new” by now.

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How do you spend the day? A day in the life of the rest of us

Thursday, 8 September, 2016

I spent a little more time than I should have, reading this MetaFilter thread about how members spend a typical day. It may seem mundane, but it’s also many parts fascinating.

This paragraph from quiet_musings‘ description of workday mornings resonated with me. The scramble to get out the door to work. Or through the door of the other room, to where my work setup is.

Once I get up, my morning is a panicked blur of scrambling to get out the door. It goes something like this: put in contacts, use bathroom, panic. Take shower, dry off, attempt to find clothes, panic. Scarf down Cheerios with granola and almond milk, gulp a few vitamin pills, panic. Throw water bottles into my purse, toss in an apple sauce cup (religiously forgetting the spoon,) panic. Argue with myself that there’s no time to apply makeup. Apply makeup anyway. (Just mascara.) Some days, literally run to my car, look at the display to see what time it is, panic.

Thankfully I don’t have to commute at the moment, that’s all I can say.

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A broken watch is right twice daily, the Now watch is right all day

Monday, 5 September, 2016

NOW Watch, by Matters.com

If a broken watch is right twice a day, how about a watch that doesn’t tell the time at all? Depending on your outlook, a watch that simply tells you now is the time, might be all you need.

Designed by Texas based entrepreneur Micah Davis, the Now – for want for a better word – timepiece, is intended to remind the wearer to slow down, and live in the moment.

Even though I’m not a watch wearer, it could be I need one of these. And they’re stylish as well.

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The dreams and aspirations of the homeless, by Horia Manolache

Tuesday, 23 August, 2016

The Prince and the Pauper is a poignant photo series by San Francisco based photographer Horia Manolache. He took two photos of homeless people, one of how they look today, and one of what they once saw themselves becoming.

There is always the hope that his subjects may yet come to realise their dreams and aspirations.

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Too much social stimulation results in a hangover for introverts

Thursday, 18 August, 2016

Unlike extroverts, introverts have limited social capital. There’s only so much time they can spend in the company of other people, especially large groups, before the desire to seek out a quiet, solitary space, becomes overwhelming.

If you’re an introvert, you already know what I’m talking about because you have likely experienced it more than once. But if you aren’t, or you need help explaining the idea to extroverted friends, here’s an attempt at a description. Introverts have a more limited ration of energy available for socializing, compared to our more extroverted counterparts. When we push past those reserves, we hit a tipping point where we go from being “fine” to “definitely not okay.” An “introvert” hangover is, simply put, a withdrawal into oneself brought on by overstimulation.

I’d have never thought to call the resulting social overstimulation a hangover though, but that’s what it feels like sometimes.

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Need to make a tough life choice? Then toss a coin. Seriously

Tuesday, 16 August, 2016

This is interesting. If you need to make a choice, say whether to leave a job, or move to another city, but are undecided as to how to proceed, then toss a coin. That’s it, toss a coin. If heads is for yes, and that’s what comes up, then go ahead and resign, or prepare to leave town.

This is the advice that US economist Steven Levitt, author of Freakonomics, dispensed to people who didn’t know what way to go on a choice, through his website. When people who had accepted the coin toss outcome were contacted several months later though, more were found to be happier than those who had not.

The people who committed to a course to action, albeit through the mere flip of coin, made a real change in their lives. Those who did not presumably stayed put, and wallowed in their indecision, and lack of action.

Doing what the coin said seemed to really matter. Levitt thinks he knows why. The people who did changed more often than the people who did not. Left to our own devices we’ve an inbuilt bias against change. Yet more often than we realise it’s the best thing we can do. Levitt’s no counsellor (he leaves that to his machine) but his advice would be that it’s often worthwhile taking a leap into the unknown – far more worthwhile than we think.

It brings to mind the line from the 1999 spoken word song, Everybody’s Free to Wear Sunscreen, produced by Australian film director Baz Luhrmann, “your choices are half chance, so are everybody else’s.” Exactly what the flip of coin is.

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A fake funeral, a new way to help you appreciate your life?

Monday, 8 August, 2016

Some people fake their deaths in an attempt to, say, start a new life, or escape heavy debts. South Koreans, however, do things a little differently.

They attend mock funerals for themselves, complete with an eulogy they wrote, and coffins that they lie in for a short time. The exercise gives participants the chance to reflect on their lives, and give thought to their eventual – real – deaths.

The program, led by Mr. Kim Ki-ho brings participants together to reflect on their lives by experiencing their own fake funeral. They write their own eulogies, make out mock wills, and pen farewell notes. Then, they dress in traditional burial linens, climb into coffins in a darkened room, and meditate on their lives for 30 minutes. Responses vary, but many said that acting out their own deaths made them appreciate their lives more, and to consider the consequences of their deaths more seriously.

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