Time doesn’t fly quite so quickly when you’re powerful, apparently

Thursday, 31 July, 2014

Being powerful, and I imagine that means being possessed of some wealth, may come with at least one extra benefit, the perception that time is passing a little more slowly, something other people miss out on.

The reason powerful people feel they have an abundance of time, the study goes on to say, is that their feelings of control over many aspects of their lives spill over onto their sense of time – which jibes with previous studies that looked at the ties between power and perception.

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All work and no play makes you far worse than just dull

Tuesday, 29 July, 2014

A degree of playfulness, as opposed to playing the fool, and we are talking about in adults here by the way, is far from a bad thing, in fact being possessed of a… spirited nature may have health and well being benefits.

What Proyer and the other researchers who have recently moved to fill that gap are discovering is that playfulness, as a personality trait, is not only complex but consequential. People who exhibit high levels of playfulness – those who are predisposed to being spontaneous, outgoing, creative, fun-loving, and lighthearted – appear to be better at coping with stress, more likely to report leading active lifestyles, and more likely to succeed academically. According to a group of researchers at Pennsylvania State University, playfulness makes both men and women more attractive to the opposite sex.

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Are teenagers today really behaving more like… adults?

Thursday, 24 July, 2014

Far from seemingly spiralling ever further out of control, teenagers would appear to be becoming ever more adult like – though I’m not really sure that is the appropriate term to use – if trends of recent years are anything to go by:

Perhaps most remarkably, Britain’s notoriously surly youths are getting more polite: according to one government survey, those born in the early 1990s are less rude and noisy in public places than previous cohorts were at the same age. “People are still being young, but they’re recognising there are boundaries,” says one youth worker in Hackney, a borough of London long known for its high crime rate.

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Being depressed… how does it actually feel though?

Wednesday, 23 July, 2014

A number of London based depression patients discuss their day to day experiences of the disorder… it’s one thing to understand the symptoms of depression, but another to know how it must actually feel.

Depression for me is not liking yourself, having no confidence in yourself, seeking reassurance, hanging onto anything that you can, pretty much anything emotionally, get your hands on. Lacking courage.

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Photography inspired by nightmares, but nothing to lose sleep over

Tuesday, 22 July, 2014

Disturbing. Unsettling. The stuff of nightmares. This collection of works by US photographer Arthur Tress, based on the bad dreams of children, is a combination of all three.

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Give yourself your own opinion, do more things alone

Friday, 18 July, 2014

It’s always fun sharing experiences with other people, but doing (possibly) the same things alone may be just as rewarding, and even edifying:

Perhaps this explains why seeing a movie alone feels so radically different than seeing it with friends: Sitting there in the theater with nobody next to you, you’re not wondering what anyone else thinks of it; you’re not anticipating the discussion that you’ll be having about it on the way home. All your mental energy can be directed at what’s happening on the screen. According to Greg Feist, an associate professor of psychology at the San Jose State University who has written about the connection between creativity and solitude, some version of that principle may also be at work when we simply let our minds wander: When we let our focus shift away from the people and things around us, we are better able to engage in what’s called meta-cognition, or the process of thinking critically and reflectively about our own thoughts.

The example here about seeing a film alone strikes a chord. I’ve always thought film writers should see the movies they’re critiquing by themselves… it can sometimes be too easy to be swayed by the opinions of those around you otherwise.

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The quest for life-work balance… since 1932

Thursday, 17 July, 2014

And you thought the desire to attain life-work balance was something relatively recent. British philosopher Bertrand Russell, writing in 1932, wanted people to spend more time doing… nothing.

Modern technique has made it possible to diminish enormously the amount of labor required to secure the necessaries of life for everyone. This was made obvious during the war. At that time all the men in the armed forces, and all the men and women engaged in the production of munitions, all the men and women engaged in spying, war propaganda, or Government offices connected with the war, were withdrawn from productive occupations. In spite of this, the general level of well-being among unskilled wage-earners on the side of the Allies was higher than before or since.

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Geniuses usually sleep eight hours, unless the world worries them

Wednesday, 16 July, 2014

The sleeping habits of geniuses… twenty-seven of them to be precise. I was hoping to find something that I might be able to take advantage of, and it looks pretty straightforward, seven to eight hours sleep seems to be the norm among smart people.

Then again no fewer than one hundred and fifty items, problems in the world and the like, may also be keeping the same people awake at night.

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Make… progress in meetings, make progress in the workplace?

Wednesday, 16 July, 2014

Sad to say, but a lot of getting ahead in the workplace is about how you look, or are perceived, rather than how capable you may actually be, and on some days it can all be down to how well you act more than anything else.

While workplace meetings are many things to many people, they can present an opportunity to stand out in this regard, it’s simply a matter of being seen to do, and say, the right things:

Make a mental note of the engineer in the room. Remember his name. He’ll be quiet throughout most of the meeting, but when his moment comes everything out of his mouth will spring from a place of unknowable brilliance. After he utters these divine words, chime in with, “Let me just repeat that,” and repeat exactly what he just said, but very, very slowly. Now, his brilliance has been transferred to you. People will look back on the meeting and mistakenly attribute the intelligent statement to you.

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Do we really need electric shocks in order to achieve our goals?

Monday, 14 July, 2014

If you’re going to give yourself any sort of electric shock, and I wouldn’t recommend doing so under any circumstances, perhaps it should be because you’re not exercising as much as you would like to. If that’s you, then a wristband that dispenses a jolt whenever you fail to meet a particular goal, may just be what you want…

Using psychologically proven and user tested algorithms, the Pavlok wristband enforces users’ commitments to fitness, productivity, and more – even if that means “sparking” their commitment by delivering a mild (but jolting) electric shock.

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