I don’t want to do anything with my life, except exist…

Thursday, 21 April, 2016

Chethan Kamath may not know what he wants to do with his life, but he certainly knows what he does not want to do. I think the list of not-want-to-do items pretty much covers all bases.

I don’t want to be a real-estate agent, a stock broker, investor, or a businessman. I don’t like manipulating numbers or people to make money. It is usually the driving force behind picking these professions. Not that making money is a bad thing, but it’s just not my thing. I’m terrible at math. I’m terrible at spinning money. I make bad bets and poor decisions. I trust people a lot. I’m very gullible and easy to rip off.

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I was busted by my brainwaves during last night’s heist

Thursday, 21 April, 2016

Forget about wearing the balaclava and gloves during tonight’s heist, it’s not your facial features, or finger prints, that will give you away, but rather your brainwaves, or brain prints, that stand to reveal your identity to the powers that be (though possibly a tin-foil hat might help).

Researchers at Binghamton University in US recorded the brain activity of 50 people wearing an electroencephalogram (EEG) headset while they looked at a series of 500 images designed specifically to elicit unique responses from person to person – eg a slice of pizza, a boat, or the word “conundrum.” They found that participants’ brains reacted differently to each image, enough that a computer system was able to identify each volunteer’s ‘brainprint’ with 100 per cent accuracy.

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I know all about you, and your future… a travel scam or what?

Wednesday, 20 April, 2016

Travellers are often the subject of all manner of scams… what can I say? Beware of strangers who claim to know anything about you, and your future.

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The most meaningful, and least meaningful jobs, rated and ranked

Wednesday, 13 April, 2016

General practitioners, occupational therapists, and education administrators, are among twenty of the most meaningful jobs, with clergy roles seen as being the most meaningful, which is no surprise since you wouldn’t have chosen such a vocation unless you felt it was especially… meaningful I imagine.

On the other hand, fast food chefs, and surprisingly I would have thought, fashion designers, are listed as the least meaningful, with the task of parking lot attendant taking out the top, or as the case may be, bottom spot on that ranking.

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Did I tell you about the time I was graduated at the top of my office?

Tuesday, 12 April, 2016

If your current employment is abruptly terminated, I wonder how you might go if you told recruitment officers you meet thereafter, at possible future workplaces, that you had in fact “graduated” from your previous role? It almost seems as if it is expected of you.

At HubSpot, the software company where I worked for almost two years, when you got fired, it was called “graduation.” We all would get a cheery email from the boss saying, “Team, just letting you know that X has graduated and we’re all excited to see how she uses her superpowers in her next big adventure.” One day this happened to a friend of mine. She was 35, had been with the company for four years, and was told without explanation by her 28-year-old manager that she had two weeks to get out. On her last day, that manager organized a farewell party for her. It was surreal, and cruel, but everyone at HubSpot acted as if this were perfectly normal. We were told we were “rock stars” who were “inspiring people” and “changing the world,” but in truth we were disposable.

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Welcome to the motel voyeur, where you can always be checked out

Friday, 8 April, 2016

For many motel owners, buying, and running, such a business is mainly a means to make a living. I also expect getting to know the stories of some of the guests might make for a bonus.

Denver motelier Gerald Foos set up shop for a somewhat more sinister reason, so he could spy on his guests, through what appeared to be ventilation grilles in the ceilings of their rooms, from a platform he had built in the motel’s attic space. This activity apparently went unnoticed for the three decades that he ran the establishment.

Despite an insistent voice in my head telling me to look away, I continued to observe, bending my head farther down for a closer view. As I did so, I failed to notice that my necktie had slipped down through the slats of the louvred screen and was dangling into the motel room within a few yards of the woman’s head. I realized my carelessness only when Foos grabbed me by the neck and, with his free hand, pulled my tie up through the slats. The couple below saw none of this: the woman’s back was to us, and the man had his eyes closed.

You might want to look more closely at would-be ventilation grilles set into the ceilings of any motel rooms you stay in from now on.

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An introvert’s survival guide to share houses

Thursday, 7 April, 2016

I have nothing against share houses, I’ve spent a fair bit of time residing in them, though the places inhabited by air cabin crew, who were always away travelling for work, were the best. Otherwise though, such living arrangements can be tough on the introverts among us, which is why I wish this handy guide had been around back in the day.

If you still find yourself living in a party house, and all that time spent in your bedroom is making you claustrophobic, try recharging elsewhere. Perhaps a private corner in the local library will hit the spot? A hidden table at a quite cafe around the corner? Or a picnic rug under a shady tree in your local park? Name these spots your “in case of emergency” retreats and go there when things get too uncomfortable at home.

An “in case of emergency” retreat? Brilliant idea. I still have those today…

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How many typos can you see in this sentence? None? You’re ok then

Tuesday, 5 April, 2016

Those who repeatedly point out typos, and various other grammatical errors, in the writings of those around them, are most likely as unpleasant as you already believe them to be.

According to a bunch of fancy linguists, people who are more sensitive to written typos and grammatical errors are indeed the kinds of Type A assholes everyone already suspects them to be.

I wonder, is it still worth my while pursuing a career as a proofreader then?

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A Medium article on seeming to be smart when writing for Medium

Monday, 4 April, 2016

Ah, this is why I’ve not published anything to online publishing platform Medium so far, I’m worried I may not be perceived as clever, smart, etc. It’s a good thing then that Giulio Michelon has published an article, on none other than Medium, that aims to help people such as myself.

But it looks like the idea is simply to write. Regardless of highly evolved you think whatever you post may, or may not, be:

Start writing on Medium, no matter if you have actual content. Just write a lot of text. I mean: reading and writing it’s no common stuff. Plus everything look super classy here.

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Are smart people better off with fewer friends? Quite possibly…

Wednesday, 30 March, 2016

Are smart people, that is highly intelligent sorts, able to get by with fewer friends, or personal acquaintances, than most other people? Are such people in fact better off with fewer friends? There’s food for thought.

Think of the really smart people you know. They may include a doctor trying to cure cancer or a writer working on the great novel or a human rights lawyer working to protect the most vulnerable people in society. To the extent that frequent social interaction detracts from the pursuit of these goals, it may negatively affect their overall satisfaction with life.

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