In and out of The Louvre in ninety minutes on a Sunday afternoon

Friday, 12 December, 2014

You’ll never guess what the highlight of my trip to The Louvre was. Well, I did study the painting in question for my art history course at high school, and to say that there’s more to it than meets the eye is a veritable understatement.

Viewing the work is likewise the focus of many other visitors to what is one of the best known art museums in the world, but do most of these people zip in and out only to see it, or do they take the time to see more of the treasures within?

Unsurprisingly visitors to The Louvre can be cast into one of two camps, short stayers, people who spend about ninety minutes there, and long stayers, those who stop for at least six hours. Surprisingly though, there is little difference in how much either type of visitor sees, it comes down to how long they take in any given art piece.

Having say an hour to gaze at the Mona Lisa would be a luxury. The jostling crowds make staying in its presence difficult for any longer than a few minutes though.

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A history of web design for web designers

Thursday, 11 December, 2014

disassociated.com takes its origins in what now seems a primordial desire of mine to be a web designer. That I had no knowledge, or for that matter, experience, in the field was irrelevant, a mere detail. I made it, for a time, but soon realised I was really looking for a way to publish online, rather than build online.

Still, it all remains a reminder to me that anything is possible, should you set your mind to it.

Anyway, for those who came in late, a brief history of web design for designers, by Sandijs Ruluks, will take you through some of the milestones, and major developments, in the field that is web design.

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A guide to the extensive, and varied, controls of a aircraft cockpit

Monday, 8 December, 2014

We’ve all seen photos of aircraft cockpits seemingly crammed with controls and instruments, but are all these dials and buttons for real, or do only a few matter? Needless to say, all are important, and do indeed serve a purpose.

The engine information shown: On the top left are two dials; they indicate the N1 setting for the left and right engine. N1 is a measure of engine power – at 100% N1, the engine is producing maximum power (right now the engines are at 22.5% N1). The second row shows the engine’s EGT (exhaust gas temperature, currently 411°C), another measure of engine power and also an important thing to monitor – if the exhaust gas is too hot, you’re in trouble. To the right of the dials is a grid where engine warnings would pop up. On the bottom right are the fuel gauges; it shows the fuel in each of the three tanks and the total fuel onboard (40,200 gallons).

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Creative success in the Internet age, it’s pixel by pixel in a way

Monday, 8 December, 2014

US artist and entrepreneur Molly Crabapple talks success, and making a living, working as a creative online. This snippet however would sum things up for many people, whether creative, online, or not:

I’ve never had a big break. I’ve just had tiny cracks in this wall of indifference until finally the wall wasn’t there any more.

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Is there such a thing as an unusual flying car? Apparently there is…

Friday, 5 December, 2014

It’s flying cars you want? Well as it happens there is some choice when it comes to such vehicles… even if this particular selection is deemed to be unusual.

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We are transparent machines, but just who does that benefit?

Friday, 5 December, 2014

We claim to crave privacy, yet we can’t resist divulging all manner of information about ourselves to anyone who wants to absorb it.

Do you know what that makes us? Transparent Machines, that’s what.

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We can move into our castle just as soon as we print it out

Thursday, 4 December, 2014

If the idea of 3D printing is something you’ve still not quite managed to grasp, then this clip of Andrey Rudenko “printing out” a castle he recently… built, might bring you up to speed.

It seems to me printing any given object is one thing, but the real work appears to lie in creating the “printing” device. Surely a mechanism that, say, prints out shag pile carpets would differ greatly from one that will produce cars.

So how do we bring such printers into existence, or there is like a master printer that prints out the sort of 3D printer that we need?

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Welcome to computer aided novel writing

Tuesday, 2 December, 2014

Might this be an easier way to write a book? Write a program, or an app, instead to write the book for you…

It’s November and aspiring writers are plugging away at their novels for National Novel Writing Month, or NaNoWriMo, an annual event that encourages people to churn out a 50,000-word book on deadline. But a hundred or so people are taking a very different approach to the challenge, writing computer programs that will write their texts for them. It’s called NaNoGenMo, for National Novel Generation Month, and the results are a strange, often funny look at what automatic text generation can do.

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There’s a lot we can do, but not so many ways to do those things

Monday, 1 December, 2014

Los Angeles based entrepreneur Fred Krueger thinks that there are too many things we still cannot do, or, more to the point, cannot do in a certain way. For instance:

  • Build a house myself using standard small interchangeable parts like legos
  • Get a quick, binding divorce online
  • Find a teacher of general relativity online. I tried

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Name your new business using this business name generator

Monday, 1 December, 2014

A few years ago I linked to the Random Exhibition Title Generator, a website that helps artists find names for exhibitions, and to this day it remains one of the more popular pages here.

In the interests then of not leaving those in the commerce world out, here’s a link to a business name generator… enter a word, and a bunch of suggestions based on that word are returned. The people at The Next Web like it, so it must be pretty good.

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