Would the world’s actual remotest city please stand up?

Thursday, 27 August, 2015

Being labelled the world’s remotest city probably isn’t as bad today as it might have been fifty, to one hundred, years ago. In the past, trying to reach such a seemingly inaccessible place might have deterred many would-be travellers. Now it would probably be the destination of choice, on account of its apparent isolation.

The problem is though, which “remotest city” in the world is in fact the remotest? There are a number of contenders for the title, including Nuuk in Greenland, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky in Russia, Mêdog in Tibet, and Perth in Western Australia.

Then there is Perth, with a metropolitan area of more than two million people, way on the other side of the outback from Sydney, 2,045 miles away. Geographically it’s actually closer to East Timor (1,731 miles) and Jakarta, Indonesia (1,865 miles). There’s no city of comparable size anywhere in the world that’s so remote.

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Bali, as seen in six short films

Wednesday, 26 August, 2015

Six stories of Balinese customs and traditions, filmed by Brandon Li, during a recent trip to Indonesia. Beautiful.

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Kurt Arrigo’s European travel Instagrams

Friday, 21 August, 2015

Photo by Kurt Arrigo

Travel has been a theme here this week, not that I’m going too far at the moment, or anything. That’s not the case for Malta based photographer Kurt Arrigo though, who spends an enviable amount of time trekking across Europe, and taking amazing photos in the process.

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Patagonia, as seen in timelapse video

Thursday, 20 August, 2015

I’ve mentioned the Patagonia region of the south of South America a few times before, and for good reason… the landscape is simply stunning. So here’s some beautifully filmed video of Patagonia. Viewing in full screen is mandatory.

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On a wingtip and a prayer, the illustrated flyer

Wednesday, 19 August, 2015

Artwork by Claire Harvey

You may need to look twice next time you’re on a flight, cruising at thirty thousand feet, when you think you see someone standing on the wing, or engine, of the aircraft. Most likely, and hopefully, it will be an illustration by Claire Harvey, that has been carefully placed on the window, rather than an actual person.

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Cruise the seas by… container ship

Tuesday, 18 August, 2015

I don’t know about anyone else, but some cruise ships, the colossal sort that berth in Sydney harbour from time to time, seem a little over rated to me.

If you want to sail the world, but find the cruise ship options do little for you, why not consider travelling on a freighter instead? Luxury is a term that certainly couldn’t be used here, but comfortable and down to earth might, and isn’t that what makes the for the best travel experiences?

At any given time, the civilian population on a freighter that carries passengers is small; they typically accommodate between 4 and 12 travelers. Freighter travel is not luxurious – but it is not as utilitarian as one would suspect. Passengers stay in cabins, often with separate bedrooms and lounges and private bathrooms. Some even have art on the walls. Rieffel’s two-room suite included a bathroom and sitting room outfitted with chairs and sofas, a television (which only picked up a signal in port), a small refrigerator and “more cabinets than you need.”

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A flight over Atlantis Chaos, Mars

Monday, 17 August, 2015

Atlantis Chaos is a region in the southern hemisphere of Mars, that may have once contained huge amounts of water. Sadly there’s no trace of any today, but this fly-over animation of the area, prepared by the European Space Agency, is no less spectacular.

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What holiday destinations say about personality

Friday, 14 August, 2015

Here’s a simple test to determine your personality type. When it comes to choosing holiday destinations, which do you prefer, the beach, or the mountains? If you selected the beach, it’s more likely you’re an extrovert, while opting for the mountains may suggest you’re an introvert.

Psychologists have long known that extroverts tend to enjoy arousing situations, even choosing to study in noisier environments, while introverts seek calmer, quieter environments. Past research has shown that extroverts have a greater need for “affiliation” – being with and conversing with others – and “exhibition” – getting attention from and amusing other people. Introverts need substantially less of these things.

It’s not an incontestable “test” mind you, more of an indication. To say nothing of the fact that some of the beaches on the NSW Central Coast can be so deserted that you’d have them to yourself anyway.

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Wandering around Porto, Portugal

Thursday, 13 August, 2015

Porto, Portugal’s second largest city, is home to Ponte Dona Maria, a wrought iron bridge spanning the river Douro, that was designed by well known French civil engineer Gustave Eiffel.

While the bridge was one place I saw, and walked across, when in Porto, I covered no where the same amount of ground that Seoul based videographer and designer Lee Hang Gab did.

That might have had something to do with my decision to spend just two nights in town, from a total of two months in Portugal. I’ll certainly stay longer next time.

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Travellers no longer have a home, they have many

Monday, 10 August, 2015

Walter Chang spent three years backpacking around the world. I’d caution against reading his account of these travels, or watching some of the video highlights, lest you find yourself grappling with a severe bout of wanderlust.

Traveling is necessary because at the very core it’s a reality check for those who travel and those receiving the traveler. You can see others with different eyes and the receiving party can see you with new eyes as well. Travel keeps us alert and prevents us from taking the easy close-minded way out. It’s the only way we can really mark off certain items on what David Brooks calls, our moral bucket list.

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