Shanghai in reverse, that’s one way to see a city

Thursday, 21 May, 2015

Walk in Shanghai by JT Singh, takes an off-beat stroll through central Shanghai… at first I wondered how they filmed some of the sequences, but that curiosity quickly gave way to a desire to be walking those exact same streets myself.

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The Cozy Suite, a more comfortable way to fly for middle seat flyers?

Tuesday, 19 May, 2015

Thomson Aero Seating Cozy Suite

Now here’s an airline seating format that could make air travel a lot more comfortable.

The Cozy Suite, developed by Thomson Aero Seating, not only makes sitting in a middle seat less bothersome, it also allows passengers to recline their seat, by way of a forward-sliding pan system, one that doesn’t intrude on the space of the person in the seat behind.

The seat also features a fixed-back shell with a pan seat recline. This means you won’t feel the passenger behind you bumping or kicking your seat and, if you recline, the forward-sliding pan means you won’t be invading that person’s space.

As a bonus, the format also allows more seats to be fitted in an aircraft, surely making them a win for everyone. So, what are the chances of seeing these seats on flights any time soon?

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Surely hitchhiking hasn’t fallen victim to ride sharing?

Tuesday, 19 May, 2015

I can’t say I spot too many hitchhikers as I make my way around, but it could be I’m in the wrong place at the wrong time. In the US however, the once popular means of getting from point A to point B, appears to have fallen from favour completely. Could that really be so?

Given how few hitchhikers one actually sees on American roadways, it’s surprising any of us even know how to do it, or what it looks like. (As far as I can tell, a lot of first-time teenaged hitchhikers are either instructed by books or movies, rather than by actual sightings of roadside thumbs.) Once a common form of early 20th-century transportation, then the cornerstone of quite a few ’60s countercultural experiences, it has been all but eradicated from public view in the United States – save for the continued obsession with serial rapists and murders like Robert Rhodes, the “truck stop killer,” and Edmund Kemper, the “co-ed killer,” whose gruesome acts committed against women continue to be the subject of countless books, articles and TV specials.

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Vietnam, from north to south

Friday, 15 May, 2015

Reverie of Vietnam, by Oliver Astrologo, filmed while travelling from the north of Vietnam, to the south, earlier this year.

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Flying by open air aeroplane, what a way to travel

Friday, 15 May, 2015

An AirCam is a small, open air, two-seater aeroplane, that somewhat resembles a winged kayak, with a range of four hundred kilometres. Such a craft would surely make for a great way to move about in relatively small hops, something US travel writer Jeff Greenwald experienced recently.

The AirCam has a range of about 250 miles, so we stopped every few hours to refuel. Sometimes there’d be someone to help us; most times Webster would pop the caps on the wing and pump the petrol himself. When it got late in the day we’d pull out our smartphones and book a basic hotel, always close to the regional airport. It was fun to come back the next morning, wheeling our carry-ons, as the desk attendant asked what time our flight was. “Don’t worry,” Webster chortled. “They won’t leave without us.”

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Antarctica, as filmed with a quadcopter

Wednesday, 6 May, 2015

If you don’t have the Vimeo Staff Pick page bookmarked, you ought to, it’s where I see many of the Vimeos I feature here.

You especially ought to bookmark Antarctica, that was filmed with the aid of a quadcopter, a drone like device used for aerial photography, by Stockholm-based filmmaker Kalle Ljung, since, if you’re not able to travel there, this may be the one of the last chances to see the frozen continent in its pristine beauty, before the ravages of climate change take their toll.

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Liberland… Europe, and the world’s, newest micronation

Wednesday, 29 April, 2015

Flag of the Free Republic of Liberland

Between the nations of Croatia and Serbia lies some seven square kilometres of what was, until recently, unclaimed land. Today it constitutes the Free Republic of Liberland, a micronation established by Vit Jedlicka, originally a Czech Republic citizen.

Liberland may be the world’s newest country, as of time of writing, but seemingly there is no shortage of people who would like to live there. To date over one hundred and sixty thousand people have applied for the three to five thousand citizenship spots that have been made available by its government.

Possibly that level of interest has something to do with the vision that Liberland’s founders have for their new nation:

The objective of the founders of the new state is to build a country where honest people can prosper without being oppressed by governments making their lives unpleasant through the burden of unnecessary restrictions and taxes. The country’s motto is: “To live and let live.”

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How does your passport rate when it comes to being “powerful”?

Friday, 24 April, 2015

The more countries a particular passport allows you visit without a visa, which contributes to its “visa free score”, the more “powerful” it is, according to the Passport Index.

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The photography of Tristan Casey

Thursday, 23 April, 2015

Take a look at the free spirited work (one or two photos slightly NSFW) of Vancouver based photographer Tristan Casey, which brings to mind places, distant and remote, I’ve been before.

See also his Instagram for more images.

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Motion sickness, a side effect of travelling by driverless car?

Monday, 20 April, 2015

Most of us travelling by way of driverless cars, when the day arrives that is, will have to be content with looking out the window, watching the world go by, rather than reading, working, or watching movies, as motion sickness may be more pronounced in autonomous vehicles:

“Motion sickness is expected to be more of an issue in self-driving vehicles than in conventional vehicles,” Sivak said. “The reason is that the three main factors contributing to motion sickness – conflict between vestibular (balance) and visual inputs, inability to anticipate the direction of motion and lack of control over the direction of motion – are elevated in self-driving vehicles.

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