Timelapse footage of aquatic wildlife, quite spectacular

Thursday, 26 February, 2015

Stunning, what else to say… this timelapse footage of marine creatures, filmed by Sandro Bocci.

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A missing cat inspired us to write a song about a… missing cat

Friday, 20 February, 2015

Their cat may not have been all that friendly, but that didn’t stop her owners spending a month searching for her after disappearing, or from writing and recording a song, performed here by Chicago based band Advance Base, about what happened.

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On the other hand, some prefer to commute by skateboard

Wednesday, 18 February, 2015

A couple of times now when I’ve been in the inner Sydney suburb of Darlinghurst around mid morning, I have seen what looks to be the same two skaters, on their boards, heading in the direction of the city, down Oxford Street.

That might not appear to be saying much, but Oxford Street is a relatively busy thoroughfare. In fact I’m surprised that the powers that be haven’t intervened. It’s not as if the skaters are invisible to them either, given the number of surveillance cameras that must surely be in the area.

But if commuting to work, or school, on a skateboard, along an arterial roadway, isn’t the ultimate statement in living the dream, or looking like you do, what is? Accordingly, there’s a lot to like about Local, by Utah filmmaker Sean Slobodan, a short film that captures this ethos.

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The VCR glitch and the art that it inspired

Wednesday, 18 February, 2015

Artwork by Corey Johnson

Video, or VCR tapes, may have been cumbersome, and prone to what seemed like all to frequent failure, possibly by way of jamming up, but some of the images, of a movie or recorded TV show, in stalled playback, could sometimes be possessed of a certain intrigue.

These errors, or erratic irregularities, have gone on to inspire Corey Johnson to create a series of eerie yet alluring artworks, some static, some animated, that he calls Art of the Glitch.

Via Kill Screen.

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Seen in the infrared, Earth becomes another planet all together

Monday, 9 February, 2015

The motion of water vapour in the atmosphere, when viewed in the infrared, almost makes Earth look like a gas planet, such as Jupiter or Saturn, albeit far more volatile.

What we’re seeing here though is an animation made up of images taken by orbiting satellites, where each, single, second represents twenty-one hours. That’s probably a good thing, it means Earth’s atmosphere isn’t quite as churned up as it appears to be here.

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Microburst rain storms are actually no small matter

Friday, 6 February, 2015

There’s rain, then there’s heavy rain, then there’s microburst rain… here’s footage of such a phenomenon, filmed by Peter Thompson, near Roma in Queensland, last week. I think it’s fair to say you’d not want to be directly below one of these:

A microburst is a small-scale downburst, thus a very localized column of sinking air caused by a small and intense downdraft (the air does not spin like it does in the case of a cyclone or tornado) within a thunderstorm. There are two types of microbursts: wet microbursts and dry microbursts.

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Living life in reverse gear

Tuesday, 3 February, 2015

You’d think that what you were seeing here was footage being played backwards, but no, that’s not the case, we are told…

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The world as seen in the macro

Tuesday, 3 February, 2015

Extreme close up photos of day-to-day objects, taken by Pyanek, how many can you identify? Some are pretty straightforward, others not quite so.

Via Colossal.

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A trailer, but for what?

Tuesday, 27 January, 2015

What does this… trailer, that was cut together with excerpts from three hundred films, tell us about contemporary film production? Are movies, especially action titles, becoming increasingly homogeneous, or are trailers?

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Climbing the Dawn Wall, almost like climbing a mirror

Tuesday, 20 January, 2015

You’ve probably heard about the recent attempt by Kevin Jorgeson and Tommy Caldwell to free climb – that is without using climbing and safety equipment to aid their actual ascent – the Dawn Wall of the El Capitan rock formation, in Yosemite National Park.

The Dawn Wall is a sheer, vertical, nine hundred metre high rock face, that is essentially featureless. By featureless, I mean it is devoid of decent footholds and ledges, things that you might expect to be present on something you intended to climb.

Instead Jorgeson and Caldwell are looking for the merest, width of half a finger and the like, ledges, or indentations, on the rock face, to grip onto. In some cases these… ledges are some distance apart, requiring the climbers to take swinging jumps across the rock face to reach them.

Now check out some excerpts of the ascent… if you’re somehow able to strap yourself into a bucket seat that’s securely bolted to a floor at sea level, before watching this, then you should, it’ll definitely enhance the feeling of false security.

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