“Growth Factor”, a short animated film by Ryosuke Oshiro

Friday, 27 March, 2015

A short film, Growth Factor, by Japanese animator Ryosuke Oshiro… a subject matter that seems quite familiar.

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Ok, I’ll be back in a week, hanging out with my to-do list…

Friday, 13 March, 2015

With the to-do list being a tad overloaded, I’m going to take off for a week, to see if one or two items thereon can be dispatched with. I’ll be back on Monday 23 March.

I’ll leave you with the Flume remix of You & Me, by Disclosure, featuring Eliza Doolittle. You might recall that this track featured in the Lacoste The Big Leap/Life is a Beautiful series of adverts that were shown in cinemas, and on TV as well I believe, about a year ago.

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The Himalayas in ultra High Definition video

Friday, 13 March, 2015

The Himalayas, filmed in ultra HD footage, from a helicopter, reaching at times, an altitude of more than seven thousand metres, or seven kilometres.

Absolutely stunning.

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Nirvana’s Lithium, as a jazz, a cappella, cover? See what you think…

Thursday, 12 March, 2015

Some twenty-four years after the release of Nirvana’s single Lithium, you’d think the grunge generation might be ready for a jazz, a cappella no less version, of the Seattle band’s classic. Yes?

No, not quite yet we aren’t (best heard at volume ten), but thanks for telling us about this cover nonetheless.

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If San Francisco were Gotham City, would it look like this?

Friday, 6 March, 2015

Gotham City SF, timelapse footage of San Francisco filmed after dark, by Toby Harriman. Gotham here refers to the black and white photography style used by Harriman.

Via Hypnophant.

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Timelapse footage of aquatic wildlife, quite spectacular

Thursday, 26 February, 2015

Stunning, what else to say… this timelapse footage of marine creatures, filmed by Sandro Bocci.

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A missing cat inspired us to write a song about a… missing cat

Friday, 20 February, 2015

Their cat may not have been all that friendly, but that didn’t stop her owners spending a month searching for her after disappearing, or from writing and recording a song, performed here by Chicago based band Advance Base, about what happened.

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On the other hand, some prefer to commute by skateboard

Wednesday, 18 February, 2015

A couple of times now when I’ve been in the inner Sydney suburb of Darlinghurst around mid morning, I have seen what looks to be the same two skaters, on their boards, heading in the direction of the city, down Oxford Street.

That might not appear to be saying much, but Oxford Street is a relatively busy thoroughfare. In fact I’m surprised that the powers that be haven’t intervened. It’s not as if the skaters are invisible to them either, given the number of surveillance cameras that must surely be in the area.

But if commuting to work, or school, on a skateboard, along an arterial roadway, isn’t the ultimate statement in living the dream, or looking like you do, what is? Accordingly, there’s a lot to like about Local, by Utah filmmaker Sean Slobodan, a short film that captures this ethos.

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The VCR glitch and the art that it inspired

Wednesday, 18 February, 2015

Artwork by Corey Johnson

Video, or VCR tapes, may have been cumbersome, and prone to what seemed like all to frequent failure, possibly by way of jamming up, but some of the images, of a movie or recorded TV show, in stalled playback, could sometimes be possessed of a certain intrigue.

These errors, or erratic irregularities, have gone on to inspire Corey Johnson to create a series of eerie yet alluring artworks, some static, some animated, that he calls Art of the Glitch.

Via Kill Screen.

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Seen in the infrared, Earth becomes another planet all together

Monday, 9 February, 2015

The motion of water vapour in the atmosphere, when viewed in the infrared, almost makes Earth look like a gas planet, such as Jupiter or Saturn, albeit far more volatile.

What we’re seeing here though is an animation made up of images taken by orbiting satellites, where each, single, second represents twenty-one hours. That’s probably a good thing, it means Earth’s atmosphere isn’t quite as churned up as it appears to be here.

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